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Friday
Jun242016

Friday
Jun242016

Look Before You Pump Fuel for Your Marine Engine; Tell EPA More Ethanol Is a Bad Idea

 

Ethanol is a type of alcohol that is frequently used as an additive to gasoline. Unfortunately, it has quickly become a major risk to our nation’s economy and way of life.

Higher concentrations of ethanol in fuel can cause serious mechanical problems in boat and car engines. The added ethanol causes the engines to run at much higher temperatures which increases wear and shortens life. Higher ethanol gas is particularly damaging to small two-stroke engines. In many engines, high ethanol fuels can damage seals and gaskets which increases the possibility of fire and serious engine damage.

Now, the government is pushing for even more ethanol in fuels. E-15, a gasoline blend that is 15% ethanol, is so destructive that insurance carriers will not cover claims and vehicle manufacturers will void warranties for engine damage due to it’s use.

Tell the Environmental Protection Agency that more ethanol is a mistake.

 

Thursday
Jun232016

Solutions Sought to Reduce Hydrilla, Related Eagle Deaths

Sterile grass carp and herbicide applications are the preferred ways to reduce hydrilla, and, by extension, the death of bald eagles at Lake Strom Thurmond (Thomas Hill) on the Georgia/South Carolina border, according to a draft management plan from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Since 1998, at least 81 eagle deaths there have been attributed to avian vacuolar myelinopathy (AVM). Scientists believe that the birds of prey contract the fatal disease from eating coots, which feed on hydrilla tainted with a toxic blue-green alga.

For five years, the Corps and other agencies have considered control measures for Thurmond, which seems to be Ground Zero for AVM-related eagle deaths. Other options included mechanical harvest and periodic drawdowns.

Of course, anglers are concerned that carp will eat  not only invasive hydrilla, but beneficial native vegetation as well. "What about the loss of fish habitat and the potential damage to the bass fishery and economic impact it has on the region?" said Gene Gilliland, National Conservation Director for B.A.S.S.

Public comment for the plan opened in late April, with public meetings scheduled for May in both Georgia and South Carolina.

AVM was first documented in 1994 at Arkansas' DeGray Lake. Since then, it has been the prime suspect in the death of hundreds of eagles, as well as thousands of geese, ducks, coots, and other birds. It's been confirmed at hydrilla-infested fisheries from Texas to the Carolinas.

“In places where dead eagles are found, invasive aquatic vegetation --- primarily hydrilla --- and the blue-green alga are always present,” said Susan Wilde at the University of Georgia, adding that the number of deaths likely is much higher than can be confirmed because scavenging animals eat the carcasses before they can be checked for the disease that seems to affect only birds.

Wednesday
Jun222016

Wednesday
Jun222016

Going Fishing Isn't Always About Catching Fish