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Friday
Oct202017

Happy Friday! Do Something Good For Yourself This Weekend: Go Fishing!

"We fish to spend time with family and friends. We fish to relax. We fish to compete. We fish to enjoy nature. We fish to remember. We fish to forget. We fish because --- along with our families, our religions, and our jobs --- it completes us."

From Why We Fish: Reel Wisdom From Real fishermen

Friday
Oct202017

Virus May Be Way To Control Carp, Mussels, Other Exotic Species

University of Minnesota researchers may be able to use a recent fish virus outbreak to combat an invasive species plaguing state lakes.

Researchers with the university's Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center are studying Koi herpesvirus to see if it can be used to control the invasive carp population, Minnesota Daily reported.

"We want to find ways to kill carp and zebra mussels and all these invasive species," said MAISRC Director Nick Phelps. "We started this particular project in 2014 — went two years and didn't see (the virus) anywhere, then saw it in seven to eight lakes in a matter of a month and a half."

 

The center first confirmed a naturally-occurring case of the virus in early August. Researchers confirmed several more cases in early October.

Carp have been in the area for more than 180 years and can disturb lake environments, said Isaiah Tolo a first-year doctoral student with the research center.

"It's a big problem here," Tolo said.

Phelps said his team hopes to release the virus into Minnesota lakes to stop the spread of invasive carp. Koi fish are a subspecies of common carp so they're both susceptible to the virus. The disease won't harm other fish because it specifically targets carp, he said.

"We've never found it in a walleye, musky or bait fish," Phelps said.

Phelps said Australian researchers have spent a decade looking into bio-control to eliminate carp. Australian researchers plan to release the virus into the environment next year, he said.

"It'll be the first time that pathogens will be used for aquatic animal control," he said. "They're pushing the envelope a bit, so we're sitting back and learning what we can from that experiment."

Wednesday
Oct182017

Wednesday
Oct182017

Possible State Record Smallmouth Caught In Montana

Mike Dominick caught this 7.51-pound smallmouth bass Sept. 23 on Montana's Fort Peck Reservoir and weighed on a certified scale. Likely state will recognize it as state record, surpassing 7.4-pounder caught in 2016 at Flathead Lake.

“I think an 8-pounder will be caught next year,” he said, noting that the fish he caught would be about 8 pounds if it was full of eggs during the spawn.

Fort Peck could easily produce that next big bass, he believes. On his last trip he caught five fish over 6 pounds. One trip he and another angler caught 30 smallmouth over 3 pounds in an hour-and-a-half and never moved the boat. The reason the fish are so beefy is the large baitfish population. He’s seen bass stuffed full of cisco, an introduced species also known as lake herring.

“They’ve got the perfect recipe for growing them, as long as the bait keeps up,” Dominick said.

Wednesday
Oct182017

Florida's MarineQuest Set For Saturday In St. Petersburg

MarineQuest is the annual open house for Florida's Fish and Wildlife Research Institute. This fun, free event will introduce you to Florida's unique environment, as well as current fish and wildlife research.

Click here for more information about presentations, exhibitors, directions, parking, etc.