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Robert Montgomery

Why We Fish

Fish, Frogs, and Fireflies

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Thursday
Sep292016

Thursday
Sep292016

Why We Fish: Chasing Rainbows

We got up at 4:15 to be on the water at 5. Unfortunately, the fish didn’t seem to care that we were there.

Then the rain started. Not all over. Mostly to the west and a little bit overhead.

In the east, where the sun hadn’t yet moved above the horizon, the sky was mostly clear.

And then came the magic. With the sun beaming up from below the skyline, my friend Norm Klayman and I watched the formation of the most spectacular rainbow that either of us had ever seen.

Normally, I don’t bother taking photos of rainbows. Even with digital, I’ve learned that cameras just can’t do them justice.

But with this one, I had to try, even though it was far too large for me  to photograph in its entirety.

If someone had asked me to get up at 4:15 to go see a rainbow, I would have said, “No, thank you. I’ve seen plenty of them.”

Yet I’m always ready to get up at such hours to go fishing.  And if I hadn’t gone fishing on this morning, I would have missed a sight that I will treasure for the rest of my life.

(This is one the many experiences that inspired my book, Why We Fish. Bill Dance and others also contributed.)

Tuesday
Sep272016

New Gulf of Mexico Reef Built with Boilers From Alabama Power

An artificial reef is being built in the Gulf of Mexico with two, 100-ton boilers recently removed from Alabama Power facilities, plus a 195-foot barge that will be sunk along with them.

Alabama Power and the Marine Resources Division of the Alabama Department of Conservation are partners in the project about 25 miles south of Dauphin Island. Alabama Wildlife Federation (AWF) helped develop the project.

"Alabama's Marine Resources Division has been a leader for decades with inshore and offshore artificial reef systems," said AWF Executive Director Tim. L. Gothard.

"The Alabama Wildlife Federation firmly believes that properly engineered artificial reefs provide ecological benefits and unique fishing opportunities for anglers--- a true win-win."

Go here for more information and photos.

Monday
Sep262016

Bass Fingerlings Get 'Early Release' for Arkansas River Stocking

About 100,000 bass fingerlings received early release from Arkansas' Cummins Correctional Facility in June, so anglers could stock them in the Arkansas River during the Simmons Bank Big Bass Bonanza.

As fishermen brought in their bass for hourly weigh-ins at five sites, they were given bags of small fish to take on their return trips for release.

“They’re spreading out and placing the fingerlings in the backwaters and areas they fish,” said Colton Dennis, coordinator of the Black Bass Program for Arkansas Game and Fish Commission (AGFC). “It’s going to be more favorable habitat than if we backed up a truck at a ramp and released thousands into an area with less complex habitat, less vegetation and more current to fight.”

The river needs a boost because of decline in spawning and nursery habitat in its backwaters, he added.

The project that began in 2001 is a joint effort of AGFC and the Department of Corrections. During spring, agency biologists collect brood fish from weigh-ins at the Dumas pool of the river. They're then placed in ponds at Cummins, once used for raising catfish.

“Roughly 200 bass are stocked into the ponds,” said JJ Gladden, biologist at the Joe Hogan State Fish Hatchery. “Our goal is to get about 200,000 fingerlings out of that."

After 100,000 fingerlings are removed for stocking throughout the river, the remainder are released into Dumas.

During the past four years, angler volunteers have stocked 373,000 fingerlings.

“Five of the 15 years suffered no measurable production because the river rose into the ponds before we could get the fingerlings out,” Dennis said.

         

Friday
Sep232016

What's Life All About? Go Fishing and Find Out!

No other activity transports us so completely into the web of life as fishing and hunting. We might no longer fish or hunt to feed our families, but these pastimes takes us closer to what life is all about than anything else I can think of --- except for maybe getting lost in the wilderness or being pursued by a grizzly bear.

And in getting closer to what life is all about, we implicitly recognize our place in it and, as a consequence, are healthier and happier in our everyday existence.

What is life all about? Go fishing and find out.

Excerpt from Why We Fish.