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Robert Montgomery

Why We Fish

Fish, Frogs, and Fireflies

Pippa's Canine Corner 

 

 

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Friday
Feb232018

Why We Fish; Do You Need To Ask?

Fishing keeps us humble, which makes us better people. Infrequent success reminds us that we have much to learn from those less “intelligent” than ourselves.

Fishing is mystery and anticipation: We cast a line in hopes of connecting to an unseen creature in an alien world. Even better, the mystery --- the thrill --- renews with every cast. And unlike with a lottery ticket or slot machine, we don’t have to pay for the privilege.

You can tell the politicians that angling is worth more than $125 billion annually if you want to. I say that it’s priceless.

Quotes are from my book, Why We Fish.

Friday
Feb232018

Working Dogs For Conservation

I stumbled onto a great organization today: Working Dogs for Conservation.

Much of the work is based on the fact that dogs have an incredibly powerful sense of smell, better than scientists can replicate with technology. You can find out more about that in my book, Pippa's Journey: Tail-Wagging Tales of Rescue Dogs.


WD4C does doubly good work by adopting shelter dogs, which otherwise might be euthanized or die after spending their lives in confinement.

The dogs are used to find and collect data on endangered plants and animals worldwide. They also help to reduce poaching in Africa, among other missions.

Please check WD4C out and considering supporting it.

 

Friday
Feb232018

Wednesday
Feb212018

Latest Anti-Fishing Lunacy In California

California has seen the number of licensed anglers fall by half since 1984, from more than 2 million to barely 1 million who purchase annual licenses.

One big reason is declining opportunities — more waters closed to fishing in both the ocean and freshwater, fewer trout raised in state hatcheries and planted, and native species like steelhead and salmon that are in a tailspin.

Another big reason is expense. The cost of licenses and stamps rises every year, even though usually the fishing is worse. A person who fishes in both fresh and salt water can spend more than $100 annually on licenses, report cards and stamps.

And then there are regulations — tackle restrictions that can be baffling and seasons that are impossible to memorize.

Sometimes the obstacles are illogical, to the point where it seems the state is purposefully trying to make anglers throw up their hands and quit.

Such is the case with a bill introduced in the Assembly last week by, not surprisingly, a Democrat from the Bay Area whose district has almost no freshwater fishing. Assemblyman Bill Quirk, while not an expert on fishing, is doing somebody’s bidding with a bill that would outlaw many lead fishing weights.

Assembly Bill 2787 was introduced Friday and quickly denounced by the California Sportfishing League.

Read rest of story here.

*    *    *    *

While I agree with the argument that this editorial makes, the author is uninformed regarding alternatives to lead. He doesn't even mention tungsten, which is my preference. But he is correct in that the alternatives are more expensive than lead.

Wednesday
Feb212018

Fishing keeps us humble, which makes us better people.  Infrequent success reminds us that we have much to learn from those less “intelligent” than ourselves.

From Why We Fish