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Robert Montgomery

Why We Fish

Fish, Frogs, and Fireflies

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Monday
Feb192018

Monday
Feb192018

Do Your Part To Protect Fish And Wildlife: Recycle That Monofilament Line

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has one of the best programs for encouraging anglers to recycle their used fishing lines. In addition to a map of bin locations across the state, its Monofilament Recovery and Recycling Program provides instructions for anglers--- no matter in what state they live--- on building both outdoor bins and personal mini bins from tennis ball containers.

Please do your part to keep discarded fishing line from maiming and/or killing fish and widllife. It's up to the responsible majority to counter the actions of the irresponsible few. And you'll feel better for doing it. If you belong to a fishing club, make line and trash pickup a regular part of your organization's activities. Also, consider installing recycled line bins at piers and ramps.

Here's what discarded line can do:


Monday
Feb192018

Sunday
Feb182018

Fishing Leads Us To Greater Love, Appreciation Of Nature

Those of us who love to fish know that it’s about more than the fish. And because it is, fishing leads most of us to a greater love and appreciation for all of nature and the outdoors.

That’s certainly the way it was for me. Some of my earliest memories are of marveling at the beauty of the little sunfish that I caught with the rod and reel combo that I ordered from the back of a comic book.

Then I learned about the sharp spines --- Ouch! --- and slimy skin of bullhead catfish.

But it wasn’t long before I started noticing what was going on around me as I fished: a water snake sunning itself on a laydown, a softshell turtle laying eggs on a sandbar, a great blue heron spearing one of those little sunfish. Getting up early showed me how beautiful early morning light can be, and staying late introduced me to hoot owls and fireflies--- and mosquitoes.

Decades later, and I still haven’t stopped enjoying and learning from the miracles of nature all around me as I fish.

But it was those early years fishing, camping, hiking, and exploring the great outdoors that led me where I am today --- and taught me so many lessons about life.

Those lessons and the experiences that taught them to me are what I write about in Fish, Frogs, and Fireflies: Growing Up With Nature.  For example, I learned about the importance of being prepared for the unexpected by hooking myself. I learned about the birds and bees from turtles and rats. And I learned that often nature has a sense of humor, as two dozen baby toads that I had put in a cigar box morphed into millions and mounted a massive counter-attack that sent my horrified grandmother scrambling onto the kitchen table.

If you fished and learned to love nature as a child, I think that you’ll enjoy this collection of essays and short stories, both humorous and serious. Also, you might learn something about nature’s mysteries, ranging from snake spit and mermaids to African lions and Ozarks dinosaurs. And, oh yeah, there’s plenty about fish, frogs, and fireflies too.

Sunday
Feb182018

Snakehead Movements Across Land Studied

With the help of Maryland Department of Natural Resources, a Ph.D. candidate at Wake Forest University is unraveling the mystery of how northern snakeheads travel across land, from one water body to another.

Noah Bressman said that the fish provided by the agency "make almost the same movements as soldiers." Only instead of crawling by moving a leg and opposite arm as a soldier does, the toothy predator moves its back fin and head in opposite directions to propel it forward.