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Monday
Mar302015

 

 

 



Monday
Mar302015

Will Alaska Sacrifice Wild Salmon for Coal?

Photo by Bill Roth, Alaska Dispatch News

Up in Alaska, politicians are being lured to surrender a wild salmon fishery to a coal company. It promises that it can remove the stream to mine 300 feet down and then, once strip mining is done, put it back together again as good as new, with  functioning surface and groundwater systems.

A former commissioner of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game insists that it can’t be done.

“I can tell you from my experience and the experience of stream restoration efforts throughout the Pacific Northwest, this proposal to remove the Middle Fork of the Chuitna River for 25 years and then put it back together as a wild salmon stream is a pipe dream; it will not work,” Frank Rue says unequivocally.

Furthermore, he adds, if PacificRim Coal is allowed to proceed, it will signal that Alaska intends to follow the Pacific Northwest, New England, Canada, and Europe in replacing its wild salmon runs with artificial propagation in the name of progress.

“If the decision is made to mine the site, we can assume that the mining company’s restoration will eventually stabilize the land and the drainage patterns, and maybe leave behind lakes and wetlands with pike and stickleback, but the lost wild salmon productivity of the Middle Fork will be permanent. Is that where Alaska wants to go?”

He adds, “This paradigm shift will shape resource decisions across the state for generations to come. It’s Alaska’s choice: Do we reserve water in our streams to support our wild, sustainable salmon, or do we sacrifice our wild salmon habitat for a one-time use of a non-renewable resource and follow the lead of others who have decimated their wild salmon?

Alaskans have until April 9 to weigh in on the debate with the Department of Natural Resources. Comments can be sent to kimberly.sager@alaska.gov.

Friday
Mar272015

Learn About the Birds and Bees

 . . . as well as other life lessons in Fish, Frogs, And Fireflies--- Growing Up With Nature, a collection of essays and short stories by Robert Montgomery, along with 13 other contributors.

Friday
Mar272015

Catching Big Bass Can Cost You Big Bucks

Earlier this year, a California angler caught a 15-pound bass on a Jerry Rago Glideator (above), a large swimbait that retails for about $100. In The Dallas Morning Herald, Ray Sasser details the cost of baits over the years, including the iconic Rapala Floating Minnow.

Friday
Mar272015

A Good Use for Asian Carp

Burr Edde (left) and stepson Lucas Miller with record blue catfish.

Burr Edde III of Malta Bend became Missouri’s most recent record-breaking angler when he landed a giant blue catfish on a stretch of the Missouri River in Saline County using a trotline. The new “alternative method” record blue catfish caught by Edde on March 21 weighed 120 pounds, 8 ounces, with a length of 55 and 1/8 inches and a girth of 45 inches.

Edde used cut Asian carp as bait.

The giant broke the previous alternative-method state-record blue catfish of 117 pounds caught in 1964 on the Osage River.

Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) staff verified the record-weight fish on March 25 using a certified scale at Bass Pro corporate headquarters in Springfield. The fish was preserved on ice for official weighing.

“Oh my goodness! That’s a big fish,” Edde recalled when he first saw the giant. “How am I going to get this one into the boat?! It was definitely an experience of a lifetime to catch one that big. I was blessed. And there are still lots of them out there!”

The longtime angler said he would have liked to release the record fish or donate it to the fish tanks at Bass Pro, but it didn’t survive long enough. “It’s too big to actually have mounted, but I’m getting a replica made.”