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Friday
Aug222014

 

 

 

 

Friday
Aug222014

'The Whole World Is a Fish . . . '

“Poets talk about ‘spots of time.’ but it is really the fishermen who experience eternity compressed into a moment. No one can tell what a spot of time is until suddenly the whole world is a fish and the fish is gone.” ---Norman Mclean

“You cannot catch trout with dry breeches.”--- Spanish proverb

“You can observe a lot just by watching.”--- Yogi Berra

Why We Fish --- Reel Wisdom From Real Fishermen

“Hell, if I'd jumped on all the dames I'm supposed to have jumped on, I'd have had no time to go fishing.” --- Clark Gable

“Only when the last tree has been felled, the last river poisoned, and the last fish caught, man will know that he cannot eat money.” --- Cree Indian saying

“Man can learn a lot from fishing — when the fish are biting no problem in the world is big enough to be remembered.” --– Orlando A. Battista

Thursday
Aug212014

Sky Isn't Falling, But Dead Zones Are Real

The Mississippi River dead zone is overloaded with nutrients from upstream sources. This photo shows the color change between the hypoxic (brown) and oxygen-rich (blue) waters. Photo courtesy of NOAA.

Climate change occurs naturally. It always has, and it always will vary from day to day, week to week, season to season, year to year, decade to decade, and century to century. Possibly humans play a role in that change in some way, but no verifiable evidence supports that. Even if it did, we, as one nation, could do little to nothing about it because our contribution is miniscule compared to what’s happening in China, India, and the rest of the world.

The billions of dollars wasted on this sky-is-falling hysteria could be far better spent on providing food and clean water to the millions who need it.

By contrast, dead zones pose legitimate threats to our fisheries and oceans and could be minimized if we changed our ways.

LiveScience.com reports the following:

“Agricultural practices are the biggest culprit for dead zones in the United States and Europe. Rains wash excess fertilizer from farms into interior waterways, which eventually empty into the ocean. At the mouths of rivers, such as the Mississippi, the glut of phosphorous and nitrogen intended for human crops instead feeds marine phytoplankton.

“A phytoplanktonic surge leads to a boom in bacteria, which feed on the plankton and consume oxygen as part of their respiration. That leaves very little dissolved oxygen in the subsurface waters. Without oxygen, most marine life cannot survive.”

In the United States, the most notorious dead zone occurs each summer in the Gulf of Mexico, spreading out from the mouth of the Mississippi River. This year, it consumes more than 5,000 square miles, slightly smaller than last year. On average, it is estimated to cost $82 million annually in diminished tourism and fishing yield.

More than 150 dead zones have been identified in this country, most of them along the coasts. A few occur inland, notably the Great Lakes.

Some of them have been cleaned up through improved management of agricultural runoff and sewage. But as fertilizer and factory farming both increase, LiveScience.com warns, “the United States is creating dead zones faster than nature can recover.”

More than 400 dead zones have been identified worldwide, covering about 1 percent of the area along continental shelves.  But likely many more than that exist, since portions of Africa, South America, and Asia have yet to be studied.

Tuesday
Aug192014

Obama to Provide More Protection for Multi-Tasking Fish in Pacific

It’s edifying --- and not a little bit frightening --- to check in occasionally on what’s happening with the true believers regarding environmental preservation and animal rights. Incredibly, I found an article online that deals with both.

1. President Obama is going to expand the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument by tenfold, banning fishing and just about any other activity across 782,000 square miles.

By the way, President George W. Bush created this preserve in 2009, but he exempted sport fishing from the ban. That won’t be the case with this president, whose National Ocean Policy is all about “zoning” uses of our oceans, coastal waters, and even inland. In other words, unelected bureaucrats and their friends in the environmental groups with anti-fishing agendas are going to tell us where we can and cannot fish.

Depressingly, I could find only one piece online that voiced concerns for U.S. fishermen--- and that was from an Australian publication, Fishing World. Everything else is glowing PR favoring expansion.

2. Fish can multi-task!

No kidding! I read it in the same article.

Before I explain, allow me to congratulate the person who wrote the headline for this piece. It’s my favorite part of the article. Here it is:

Fish found to have cognitive & cooperative abilities perhaps superior to those of Members of Congress

You’ll get no arguments from me on that.

But then consider this:

“Various studies demonstrate, according to Brown, that fish can ‘perform multiple complex tasks simultaneously,’ an ability that was until recently considered to be uniquely human; ‘have excellent long-term memories,’ including of times, places, locations, social experiences, and aversive situations;   ‘live in complex social communities where they keep track of individuals and can learn from one another, a process that leads to the development of stable cultural traditions…similar to some of those seen in birds and primates’;   ‘show signs of Machiavellian intelligence such as cooperation and reconciliation’; use tools; and ‘use the same methods for keeping track of quantities as we do.’”

That Eisteinian assessment of bass, catfish, and carp comes from Dr. Culum Brown, a biology professor in Australia.

So. . . what else do you suppose that big largemouth was doing at the same time it spied your frog twitching across the surface? Was it playing cards --- I’ll refrain from naming the game --- with friends? Was it picking up its fry from school? Was it also considering a very enticing Texas-rig lizard that your friend was retrieving?

The next time that I catch a bass, I think that I'll ask her.

Monday
Aug182014

Scientists Propose Length-Based Records for Threatened Species

When I first saw the following headline, I feared that this was one more assault on sport fishing by the preservationist movement:

Scientists Want to End Traditional Trophy Fishing of Threatened Species

But that is not the case. In fact, what these researchers are proposing makes a lot of sense.

“The most common method of certifying the size of landed fish is based on mass. But weighing large fish typically requires anglers to transport them to an official land-based weigh station—a method that makes it unlikely that the fish will survive,” says an article at Sciencemag.org.

“In many cases, this means the loss of egg-bearing females, because the females are larger than males in many species. So by killing big fish, the authors note, trophy anglers often remove individuals that are capable of producing the most high-quality larvae and helping depleted populations recover.

“Shifting to length-based records could reduce such mortality, says the research team, led by researchers at the University of Miami’s Abess Center for Ecosystem Science and Policy. Anglers could use cameras or smart phones to validate catches and release record fish where possible.”

Additionally, scientists propose this for just 7 percent of the species on the list maintained by the International Game Fish Association. Those are the ones listed as either  vulnerable, endangered, or critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List.

David Shiffman, the study’s lead author and a marine biologist studying shark biology and conservation at the University of Miami, says the analysis was inspired by recent hearings concerning a proposed ban on killing scalloped and great hammerhead sharks in Florida waters— two species listed as endangered on the IUCN Red List.

“Several anglers said they were opposed to protecting these species, one of which is so depleted that it just became the first species of shark protected by the U.S. Endangered Species Act, because it would stop them from going for IGFA world records,” he says.