My Facebook pages

Robert Montgomery

Why We Fish

Fish, Frogs, and Fireflies

Pippa's Canine Corner 



(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
Get Updates! and Search
No RSS feeds have been linked to this section.





« Bass Learn And Remember | Main | Fishing Leads To Love Of Nature, Outdoors »

Healthy Bass Less Likely To Stockpile At Tournament Weigh-In Sites

Nationwide studies suggest that how far tournament-caught bass disperse from a weigh-in site is directly related to their condition, according to Todd Driscoll, fisheries biologist for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD).

"In general, it appears that if largemouth bass are released after tournaments in good shape, only short-term stockpiling occurs at release sites, as most fish disperse form release sites within 2 to 3 months and up to 40 percent of these fish may return to original capture sites," he said.

While displaced fish have demonstrated homing abilities up to 13 miles, he added, few make it back to their original territories if they are moved more than 6 miles.

"In contrast, as tournament-related stress increases, bass will disperse less," the biologist explained.

Additionally, specific rates of movement following individual tournaments likely are affected by available habitat, food availability, fish size, water temperature, and location of release, such as main lake or cove.

Meanwhile on one of the country's most popular tournament lakes, Texas' Sam Rayburn, a study indicates "that population-level impacts of tournament-related bass relocation and concentration are likely low.

"No question, stocking at release sites does occur, as we estimated that 31,050 bass were transported to weigh-in sites during the one-year study," Driscoll said.

"But we also estimated that tournament anglers transport only 5 percent of the total largemouth bass population of legal-length in one year. Simply put, only 1 out of 20 bass are subjected to relocation and potential crowding at release sites each year."

Just how popular is tournament fishing at Rayburn? TPWD estimates that 52 percent of that fishery's anglers participate in at least one competition per year, compared to only 6 percent of all Texas fishermen.

"We also estimated that there are over several hundred bass tournaments per year at Sam Rayburn, with tournament fishing comprising 36 percent of the total annual fishing effort (including practice fishing), and 46 percent of the bass fishing effort," Driscoll said.

PrintView Printer Friendly Version

EmailEmail Article to Friend

Reader Comments

There are no comments for this journal entry. To create a new comment, use the form below.

PostPost a New Comment

Enter your information below to add a new comment.
Author Email (optional):
Author URL (optional):
Some HTML allowed: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <code> <em> <i> <strike> <strong>