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Friday
Oct102014

Bass Assist With Native Mussel Restoration

Photo courtesy of Nathan Eckert, USFWS

Smallmouth and largemouth bass assisted recently with an innovative program to boost sagging mussel populations in Wisconsin.

Carrying shellfish larvae in their gills, they were released into the Chippewa River by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS).

“The fish will swim around like normal and, after a week or two, the mussel larvae will mature and drop from the fish gills down into the substrate,” explained biologist Nathan Eckert. “In doing a free release of fish with mussels, our hope is that the fish drop off more mussels than would occur naturally, thus bolstering the native population.”

For the project, 2,500 bass were released with larval mucket, 1,050 walleye with larval black sandshell , and 800 lake sturgeon with larval hickorynut.

“Mussels are nature’s water filter,” the biologist said. “They leave the water cleaner than they found it. This is a benefit that the public will receive, even if they do not notice it.”

Additionally, cleaner water allows for more robust phytoplankton and zooplankton populations, which provide the base of the food chain for bass and other game fish.

Biologists “equip” the fish by placing them in tubs of water and then pouring in the larvae. “We let them swim around in the mussel glochidia soup for about a half hour and, during that time, the mussels grab ahold of the fish’s gills,” Eckert said.

With preliminary findings encouraging, FWS also has used this method to assist with recovery of the endangered Higgins eye pearlymussel in tributaries of the Upper Mississippi River.

“We haven't found many, but we have recovered individuals from multiple age classes in two of those streams and the individuals have reached maturity,” the biologist explained.

“Now we are watching and waiting to see if those individuals will start reproducing on their own. Once we have documented that the animals we released are reproducing, we can declare the effort a success and the population has been re-established in these streams where that mussel hasn't been seen in the last 100 years.”

Friday
Oct102014

Friday Fishing Wisdom

“There will be days when the fishing is better than one's most optimistic forecast, others when it is far worse.  Either is a gain over just staying home.”  --- Roderick Haig-Brown

 “Beginners may ask why one fishes if he is to release his catch. They fail to see that the live trout, sucking in the fly and fighting the rod is the entire point to our sport. Dead trout are just so much lifeless meat.” --- Ernest G. Schwiebert, Jr.

Why We Fish --- Reel Wisom From Real Fishermen

“I fish better with a lit cigar; some people fish better with talent.”  ---Nick Lyons

“By the time I had turned thirty, I’d realized two important things. One, I had to fish. Two, I had to work for a living.” --- Mallory Burton

“I never drink water because of the disgusting things that fish do in it.” --- W.C. Fields

Wednesday
Oct082014

Florida's TrophyCatch 'Huge Success' in Second Year

TrophyCatch at Lake Istokpoga. Photo provided by FWC

Season two of TrophyCatch was a "huge success," according to The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC).

In season two alone, we documented about 1,000 trophy-sized bass caught in Florida and released to continue growing, spawning and challenging anglers,” said Tom Champeau, director of the FWC’s Division of Freshwater Fisheries Management.

Five anglers caught Hall of Fame bass weighing more than 13 pounds each. They will receive  hand-painted replicas of their catches (a $500 value), as well as $200 in gift cards from Bass Pro Shops, Rapala and/or Dick’s Sporting Goods.

Another 229 anglers joined the Trophy Club in season two by submitting photos documenting bass 10 to 12.9 pounds that they caught and released. Each earned $150 in gift cards, plus a long-sleeve custom shirt from Bass King Clothing.

A remarkable 758 bass weighing 8 to 9.9 pounds were entered in the Lunker Club, and each generated $100 in gifts cards and a short-sleeve Bass King T-shirt. Finally, 386 bass over 8 pounds were submitted that did not have the required information to be accepted into TrophyCatch but received certificates as Big Catches.

Although all bass must have been caught between Oct. 1, 2013, and Sep. 30, 2014, to be included in the season two competition, anglers have until Oct. 15 to get their catch submitted and approved. After that the annual champion will be announced and win the Championship Ring, provided by the Americans Outdoor Fund. The current leader is Joseph Morrell, who caught, documented’ and released a 14-pound, 9-ounce Florida largemouth on March 8 in Kingsley Lake, Clay County.

Every angler who registered, free of cost, at TrophyCatchFlorida.com is entered into an annual drawing for a $40,000 bass boat package. Phoenix boats donated a 619 Pro, powered by Mercury Marine and equipped with a Power-Pole shallow-water anchoring system. In addition, every time an angler has a TrophyCatch verified, he or she earned 10 more chances to win the boat.

To see who the finalists are for this year’s random drawing and to learn when and where the boat will be given away, go to FaceBook.com/TrophyCatchFlorida. By subscribing to YouTube.com/TrophyCatchFlorida you can check out the winners from the first year and be notified when the new winners’ videos are posted.

“Year two produced five times as many winners as the first year,” said KP Clements, TrophyCatch director. “We know there are many more trophy bass that were caught and released but not documented because anglers did not have the necessary tools to verify the weight or didn’t yet know about the program.”

Remember, season three (Oct.1, 2014 – Sep. 30, 2015) is underway, so take a camera and scale fishing with you. Be sure to get the required photo of the entire bass, head-to-tail on the scale, with the weight legible, and the scale held properly by the handle. The photo of the whole fish on the scale is critical to being approved for rewards, so the higher the resolution and sharper the image the better.

You also may submit supplemental photos that aren’t required. Consider including a close-up of the scale to make it easier to read the weight, a photo of the length and maybe girth, and a photo of the angler holding or releasing the catch. You can upload up to five photos or an MP4 video with each submission.

Tournament anglers can participate by submitting a photo of themselves with their catch and a link to the official tournament results showing their name, the weight of the individual bass, date and water body. Another option for large-tournament anglers is to include a photo of a digital scale printout that has that data imprinted on it.

Fishing guides around the state are finding this a great way to promote their business by helping customers get the required weight photos and telling them how easy it is to register and submit their catch.

All of this activity helps achieve the TrophyCatch goals, which are to preserve these valuable fish, learn how to enhance their abundance, and promote recreational fishing.

To see all the catches, go to TrophyCatchFlorida.com and click on “View Gallery” or “Search.” The latter allows you to narrow down results by angler, county, water body or date. 

Monday
Oct062014

More Anglers Choosing Kayaks; Here's Why

New Jersey kayak angler Richie Moschella

Unless you are one of a small but growing number who fish from a kayak, chances are that what you think you know about the little craft is wrong.

You think that they are too unstable? Not anymore. Now you can stand up to fish.

You think that they are too uncomfortable? Not anymore. How does a swivel seat sound?

Want electronics? You can have that too.

And, hey, you don’t even have to paddle if you don’t want to. Some fishing kayaks now have pedal drive systems. That means you can move backward as well as forward, with both arms free, and cast as you go.

“Ten years ago, you had to fish out of a touring kayak,” said Richie Moschella, a longtime B.A.S.S. member, kayak fishing veteran, and host of the Reel Deal Fishing Show out of New Jersey.

“But, in the last two years, kayak fishing has just exploded. Today, some (fishing industry) companies are even starting kayak fishing pro staffs.”

Statistics from the Outdoor Industry Association reflect that “explosion.” In 2009, kayak fishing participation wasn’t even surveyed. Today, nearly 1.8 million anglers say that they fish from these lightweight, easily portable craft.

 For fishermen, at least, those first-generation kayaks were unstable and uncomfortable, and they were not suited for adding options. Rather than providing the means to better enjoy another outdoor activity such as fishing, they were intended solely for what their name implies--- touring. Just casting from one of those could be perilous because of their tendency to tip with the slightest shift in weight.

“I never liked canoes after tipping one,” said T. Chad Montgomery, a Georgia angler. “When I found Freedom Hawk, I could stand, which is how I prefer to fish, and the stability gave me peace of mind. I was hooked immediately for something I said I’d never be into.”

The Freedom Hawk provides a perfect example of how touring kayaks have evolved into man-powered fishing machines. It features an outrigger system that can be extended into a Y shape for stand-up fishing. It also offers a casting brace to lean against.

Down in Louisiana, meanwhile, Russ Pylant now fishes from a top-of-the-line Hobie Pro Angler 14, a pedal-powered craft with lots of bells and whistles that retails for about $3,000. And at 6-5 and 260 pounds, he can stand and fish comfortably in it.

“You give up some speed and maneuverability for stability and standing capacity,” he explained.

But Pylant began with a more modest vessel. 

“I started out with a Bass Pro Ascend (about $500),” he said. “It only took me a few months to see this hobby was going to stick and I upgraded to a Wilderness Systems Tarpon 140 (about $1,200).

Moschella, who gives seminars on kayak fishing, added that an angler should pay at least $500 for his first kayak, while a “decent kayak setup” likely will run $700 to $1,200.

“I know so many who buy cheap,” he said. “I tell people that what they pay is the experience that they will have.”

The New Jersey angler explained that he experienced some of that when he started kayak fishing in 2007. “Some of them were cheap and bad,” he said. “They took on water. They sat too low. They didn’t move true in the water. Yeah, they might weigh less, but you get what you pay for.”

His choice today is a Native Watercraft, 12-foot, sit-on-top that weighs about 75 pounds and retails for about $1,200. “It’s so comfortable that it’s almost like sitting in a chair. Nine hours seems like nothing,” he said. “Native Watercraft really thought about fishermen when it made this kayak.

Russ Pylant. Photo by Casey Brunning of FiN Crazy. Click photo for more information.

One of the most important steps in the evolution from touring to fishing has been development of the sit-on-top kayak. Typically, sit-in varieties are more difficult to get into and launch and are more prone to tipping. Additionally, angler movement is more restricted.

Besides allowing the fisherman to stand in some models, the sit-on-top also offers better leverage for a hookset, even when the angler is seated. Still, it’s a good idea to exercise caution, even in kayaks designed for fishing. Before moving into deep water for the first time, practice casting and reaching around you in the shallows to gauge your stability. In general, you’ll want to use your arms more and cast with a little more finesse than you would from shore or in a bass boat.

“If the water favors it, many kayak anglers side straddle their kayaks, meaning they sit side ways while their legs dangle in the water,” said Austin Kayaks. “Keeps you cool but also provides a general feeling of balance and many find it a bit more comfortable of a position, especially if paddling and fishing for long periods of time. A general rule of thumb is to always keep your body upright and your head centered over your kayak.”

Another advantage of the sit-on-top are the scupper holes, which make the vessel self-baling.

Aside from a drainage system and a comfortable seat, what else should an angler have to start kayak fishing? A paddle and a personal flotation devices are basics. Also, he probably will want rod holders and a storage system. Other options include a rudder, anchor, electronics, and safety light for after-dark fishing. Pylant keeps a floating net and measuring board for tournaments.

“The possibilities are endless,” Moschella said. “You can have video/GoPro (camera) holders too. You can just keep building on.

“You can find bundle packages too,” he added. “Some of the kayak fishing stores will install things for you, and the online stores might too. Most of them are owned by people who love the sport and want to pass it on.”

What’s to love about kayak fishing? That’s easy, according to Moschella, Montgomery, Plant, and many others: It’s much less expensive than the bass boat option, with virtually no cost for fuel or upkeep, and it allows you into places that larger and/or motorized craft can’t access. Also, kayaks are easy to transport, either on top of a car, in the bed of a truck, or with a lightweight C-Tug cart that can be dismantled and stowed in the vessel.

“I can’t think of a better way to fish,” Moschella said. ‘You can get into that pad field that a bass boat can’t get into. You can paddle right up to a (fallen) tree and see the submerged branches. You can use map services to find ponds that only you can get into. It’s like fishing unpressured, private waters.”

 Kayak Tournament Fishing

 Many like kayaks for fishing because of the serenity aspect, exploring remote backwaters with no outboard to scare the fish or disturb the peace. But as fishing kayaks evolve, so do how they are used. Those who can’t afford bass boats and don’t want to fish out of the back now have another option.

“Tournaments are really spiking,” Moschella said. “You see them mostly in salt right now, but they’re becoming more popular in fresh.

“In New Jersey, we’re seeing it in small tournaments. You take photos and measurements. It’s the honor system.”

He hopes that aspect will expand. “I’d like to see a pro tour, maybe with B.A.S.S. involved,” he said. “But we’re not at that point yet.”

Heroes on the Water

Fishing from kayaks also has a therapeutic quality, according to this organization, which arranges trips for veterans.

“What looks like a day trip of paddling and fishing is, in fact, something much deeper and long-lasting,” it says on its website. “Our unique kayak fishing program allows the participants a chance to decompress from the stresses associated with combat and the physical rigors of rehabilitation. Warriors enjoy these benefits while on guided fishing trips held in local communities around the country.”

One soldier called the outings “triple therapy,” since they provide physical by paddling and fishing, occupational through learning a lifetime sport/activity, and mental by relaxing in nature with no distractions or expectations of performance.

Kayak Fishing Statistics

1.8 million people participated in kayak fishing in 2013 for a three-year growth rate of 20 percent.

1 in 38 kayak anglers are female.

1 in 5 kayak anglers cast their lines in Florida.

(Source: Outdoor Industry Association’s Outdoor Recreation Participation Report 2014, and 2013 YakAngler.com Survey)

(This article appeared originally in B.A.S.S. Times.)

Friday
Oct032014

Friday's Fishing Wisdom

 

“There will be days when the fishing is better than one's most optimistic forecast, others when it is far worse.  Either is a gain over just staying home.”  --- Roderick Haig-Brown

 “Beginners may ask why one fishes if he is to release his catch. They fail to see that the live trout, sucking in the fly and fighting the rod is the entire point to our sport. Dead trout are just so much lifeless meat.” --- Ernest G. Schwiebert, Jr.

Why We Fish --- Reel Wisdom From Real Fishermen

“I fish better with a lit cigar; some people fish better with talent.”  ---Nick Lyons

“By the time I had turned thirty, I’d realized two important things. One, I had to fish. Two, I had to work for a living.” --- Mallory Burton

“I never drink water because of the disgusting things that fish do in it.” --- W.C. Fields

 “Some men would rather be photographed with their fish than with their wives.” --- Gwen Cooper and Evelyn Haas