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Friday
Oct272017

Canadians Say Asian Carp Are In Lake Huron

Canadians are saying that they have conclusive evidence that Asian carp now are in Lake Huron. Considering that lake's central location among, that would mean the invaders have easy access  to Lakes Michigan, Erie, and Superior, although the latter might be too infertile and cold for them to thrive there.

Or, if this report is true, carp already could be in Michigan and moved into Huron from there.

Still, this also could be much ado about nothing in terms of the Asian carp that post the greatest threat to the Great Lakes. Those are bighead and silver.

In Canada, grass carp also are commonly referred to as Asian. While they certainly would not be a welcome addition to the lakes, they don't pose the threat to the sport fishery that the other two do. Grass carp feed on aquatic vegetation, which would diminish beneficial fish habitat. But they don't quickly dominate a water body as the other two do.

Bighead and silver, meanwhile, are filter feeders, gobbling up phytoplankton and zooplankton, the base of the food chain for the young of most sport fish, as well important food for shad and other native filter feeders. Also they are prolific, growing large quickly and crowding out other species with their numbers and mass.

Here's one of the Canadian articles about the discovery:

A delegate to last week’s Coastal Municipal Forum says there is now conclusive evidence that Asian Carp are now in Lake Huron.

Dave Myett, a councillor with Saugeen Shores, says the Ministry of Natural Resources has told them they’re able to test the water and determine what kind of fish has passed through by the presence of their DNA. And they say they have found the presence of Asian Carp DNA.

Myett says at this point they can’t tell how many there were or their size. He points out they’re a very elusive species so anyone that either finds a dead one or catches one should notify the ministry.

Myett also points out that given their size and they’ll ability to procreate once they reach a body of water they eventually out eat and dominate other species.

The forum was hosted by the Lake Huron Centre for Coastal Conservation

“We have been led to believe by the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry that there is conclusive evidence that the DNA has been detected of the Asian Carp in Lake Huron,” says Myett. “They can test the water at the source points and they can tell what kind of fish has passed through there by telling if the DNA is present in the water.”

“They seem to be an elusive species,” says Myett. “They’re rarely seen on the shoreline or caught. They’re very hard to catch. If someone finally finds a dead one or catches one in a net or fishing, then I’m sure the Ministry would very much like to hear about it.”

Wednesday
Oct252017

Wednesday
Oct252017

One of California's best fisheries for big bass, Clear Lake, is in a slump according to the Sacramento Bee newspaper. Average size bass caught in this northern California fishery during tournaments in 2016 was about 3 pounds,  which probably was as good as, if not better than, any other lake in the country.

But in a recent tournament with 38 anglers, winning weight was just 16 pounds, with 9 pounds good enough for second.  "Many of the fishermen said this was the poorest fishing they had ever experienced on Clear Lake," the newspaper reported. "They also said the water was extremely brown in color throughout the lake."

Black bass are not native to California, but were introduced there more than a century ago. Recognizing Clear Lake's trophy potential because of its warm, shallow water and abundant habitat, the Department of Fish and Game started stocking Florida-strain bass in 1969. Current lake record was a 17.52-pound trophy caught in 1990. Southern California lakes, including Castaic, Casitas, Dixon, and Miramar, meanwhile, have yielded lunkers of more than 20 pounds.

Monday
Oct232017

The 100-Pound Striper

Does it exist? 90-pounders have been documented in the recent past. and older references say that 125-pounders were caught off the coast of North Carolina during the 1890s.

To find out more, check out this story in The Fisherman.

Friday
Oct202017

Happy Friday! Do Something Good For Yourself This Weekend: Go Fishing!

"We fish to spend time with family and friends. We fish to relax. We fish to compete. We fish to enjoy nature. We fish to remember. We fish to forget. We fish because --- along with our families, our religions, and our jobs --- it completes us."

From Why We Fish: Reel Wisdom From Real fishermen