My Facebook pages

Robert Montgomery

Why We Fish

Fish, Frogs, and Fireflies

Pippa's Canine Corner 

 

 

Loading..
Loading..
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
Loading..
Loading..
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
Loading..
Loading..
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
Loading..
Loading..
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
Get Updates! and Search
No RSS feeds have been linked to this section.

 

 

 

 

 

Friday
May272011

Anglers Unite to Better Protect Fisheries During Gas Extraction

As drilling increases for natural gas, especially in the Marcellus Shale area of the east, several sporting groups have joined forces to speak out for better protection of woods and waters in this process.

“While there have been many concerns expressed about Marcellus Shale gas development, the voices of sportsmen and women are beginning to emerge in the public dialogue,” said Katy Dunlap, Eastern Water Project Director for Trout Unlimited.

 “A number of key organizations have joined forces to give sportsmen and women an opportunity to be heard—so that together we can advocate for common sense policies and practices to ensure that Marcellus Shale gas development does not negatively impact sportsmen's interests.” 

Read more here.

Natural gas is an efficient and abundant fuel that should be utilized. The big problem is that its extraction has not been sufficiently regulated to protect aquatic life and human health. For example, the process has been exempt from provisions of the Clean Water Act and the Safe Water Drinking Act.

The value of natural gas stands in stark contrast to ethanol, an industry created by the feds that has proven an environmental and economic boondoggle of epic proportions. Its creation from corn has diminished the food supply, as well as depleted and polluted waterways. Additionally, its mandated blending with gasoline has increased fuel costs and damaged or destroyed thousands of marine and other internal combustion engines.

The only ones who have benefitted from ethanol are corn growers and those who process it into fuel --- aided by government subsidies.

Friday
May272011

Wisconsin to Allow Culling

Here’s great news for tournament fishermen in Wisconsin. That state now will allow culling, the practice of releasing smaller (but legal) fish as larger ones are caught.

“Since 1980, Wisconsin B.A.S.S. and other anglers have been working with the Wisconsin state legislature and fisheries managers to improve the management of black bass and black bass fishing, to include instituting bag limits, habitat programs, and tournament standards,” said B.A.S.S. Conservation Director Noreen Clough.

“Legislation to allow culling at bass tournaments is the major highlight in those efforts and has been a long time coming.”

To read more, go here.

Friday
May272011

Anglers' Allies Push Bills to Open Access

Members of the Congressional Sportsmen’s Caucus from both sides of the aisle are pushing legislation that potentially could open thousands of acres of federal lands and waters to fishing, hunting, and other outdoor recreation activities.

“Coupled with bipartisan congressional support and the support of more than 40 hunting, fishing, and conservation groups, this bill (H.R. 1997, Making Public Lands Public Act in the House and S. 901 in the Senate) is a win for all--- the sportsman, the land management agencies, and the willing private land owner,” said Rep. Jeff Miller.

“At no additional cost to the taxpayer, this legislation, which would provide increased land access, will afford the hunters, anglers, recreational shooters, and all in the sportsmen community the opportunity to continue to enjoy the great outdoors.”

To learn more, go here, and encourage your senator and representative to support this legislation.

Friday
May272011

RFA Says Anglers Must Get Active to Protect Fishing

The Recreational Fishing Alliance says that anglers must get their senators and representatives in Congress involved in reforming the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act. For some time now, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and its subsidiaries have been using the act like a club to close fisheries and force anglers off the water.

"There's a huge disconnect between what fishermen see on the water each day and what the federal fisheries service folks are actually telling us is out there," said RFA Executive Director Jim Donofrio. 

"They say our observations are purely anecdotal, while their information allegedly comes from the best available science.  Our regional (fisheries management) council members end up as the messengers of doom, the troopers on an open highway writing court mandated tickets for exceeding a far too conservative speed limit." 

Read more here.

Friday
May272011

Be an Activist on the Water; Don't Wait Until It's Too Late

As you head out fishing, remember the power of the storms that have blown through much of the country this spring.

If you see ominous weather approaching, get off the water quickly. If you can’t, look for a way around it. Most importantly, don’t wait until it’s too late.

And heed this advice from BoatUS.