My Facebook pages

Robert Montgomery

Why We Fish

Fish, Frogs, and Fireflies

Pippa's Canine Corner 

 

 

Loading..
Loading..
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
Loading..
Loading..
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
Loading..
Loading..
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
Loading..
Loading..
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
Get Updates! and Search
No RSS feeds have been linked to this section.

 

 

 

 

Saturday
Jan152011

AA Term of the Week: Spatial Planning

Spatial planning is a strategy devised by the Obama Administration to determine where you can and cannot fish. Here is party line about need for spatial planning.

 Common tactic by big-government proponents is to identify a problem where none exists so that they can implement their “solution.” You see that right now with internet regulation and proposed resurrection of the Fairness Doctrine, which is anything but fair.

 Using spatial planning, the National Ocean Council will “zone” uses of our waters to avoid user conflicts --- the problem that doesn’t really exist, at least not on a scale that requires big-government micro-management. It will decide where we can do what on public waters.

 Of course, we won’t lose the right to fish all at once. We’ll lose a little bit here, a little bit there, as specific waters are “zoned” against recreational angling to better protect against us against those nasty user conflicts.  It will be death by a thousand cuts instead of by one fatal blow.

 Yes, user conflicts occasionally do occur. Possibly you’ve been involved in one. Do you think spatial planning would have solved it? If so, please tell me about it.

Saturday
Jan152011

Catch Sails, Support RFA, Help Protect Angler Rights

Photo copyright Robert Montgomery

Prospects are good for plenty of action at the 48th Annual Buccaneer Cup Sailfish Release Tournament coming up Jan. 19-22 out in south Florida.

All proceeds go to support the Recreational Fishing Alliance and its mission "to safeguard the rights of saltwater anglers, protect marine, boat and tackle industry jobs, while ensuring the long-term sustainability of U.S. saltwater fisheries."

 "Just when we thought the action couldn't get any better, 36 boats in the WPB (West Palm Beach) Fishing Club's Silver Sailfish Derby released 670 sailfish last week," reported Gary Caputi, tournament director for the Buccaneer Cup. 

 "Reports to the north indicate that there are still major bodies of sailfish moving south, plenty of bait to keep and hold them and the potential to smash the record we set last year." 

 

Friday
Jan142011

Montana Anglers: Watch Your Wallets!

The U.S. Sportsmen's Alliance reports that two bills have been introduced in Montana that would divert funds from the state's Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.

This is a frequent tactic by politicans at both the state and federal levels, who jealously eye funding dedicated for fish and wildlife management.

Most states finance management of their fish and wildlife almost entirely through license fees and tags and allocations from the federal Wallop-Breaux (for fishing) and Pittman-Robertson (for hunting) programs. Feds have tried to steal portions of Wallop-Breaux a couple of times, with B.A.S.S. founder Ray Scott helping stop the theft.

Friday
Jan142011

Hydrilla kills

Possibly the most sinister threat posed by exotic species is that their invasions bring unexpected consequences.

 For example, we anticipated that zebra mussels would crowd out native shellfish and block water intakes with their dense colonies. We suspected that Asian carp would out-compete native fish for food and habitat.

 But we didn’t know that hydrilla, an aquatic plant much favored by bass anglers, would lead to the death of bald eagles. Yet that is exactly what has been happening off and on throughout the Southeast since the mid 1990s.

 photo copyright Robert MontgomeryThe Augusta Chronicle reports the latest casualties to be five eagles at Clarks Hill (Thurmond Lake) on the Georgia/South Carolina border. In addition, the Nashville Leader says that a potential AVM casualty has been found at Arkansas’ Lake Greeson.

Continued

Friday
Jan142011

Get the Lead Out; Try Tungsten

Bass Pro Shops

 

While lead is legal, cheap, and certainly effective,  I'd rather my fishing weights not be made of a heavy metal.

For bullet weights, I go exclusively with tungsten. It is harder and heavier than lead, meaning weights are smaller and far more sensitive to whatever they touch or are touched by. It's that "feel," that heightened sensitivity, that sold me.

Yes, tungsten is more expensive, but I think that it's well worth the extra pennies.

Lots of companies are offering tungsten alternatives these days. One of them is Bass Pro Shops. Click on the banner and, in the "search for" window, plug in XPS tungsten worm weights to see that company's offerings.