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Entries in bass fishing (38)


Are We Making Bass Lazy?

Anglers may be influencing the evolution of bass and the consequences do not look promising, according to a ground-breaking study by the Department of Natural Resources and the Environment (DNRE) at the University of Connecticut.

“This scenario genetically favors the fish with lower metabolisms, the fish that are less likely to be caught by anglers,” said researcher Jason Vokoun. “It suggests that we may be permanently changing exploited fish populations over the long term.”

And what we might be changing them into are the aquatic equivalent of couch potatoes, fish not as likely to be caught because they are less aggressive.

The potential for recreational fishing to act as an evolutionary force is well established as a theory, according to the university. “But this is the first study to identify outcomes of selection from recreational fishing of wild populations using unfished populations as reference,” it said.

In the study funded by the state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP), scientists collected young bass from fished and unfished lakes. After being tagged to identify their places of origin, the fish were released into protected waters. A year later, researchers collected them and measured their resting metabolisms.

They found that a significantly higher number of fish taken from the lakes where fishing was allowed had lower metabolic rates than bass from unfished waters. “This results point to a reduction in the type of behavior that is so prized by anglers,” said Jan-Michael Hessenauer, a doctoral student.

Why is this happening? Scientists aren’t as certain about that. Possibly nests guarded by more aggressive males fail more often because those fish are caught, and, as a consequence, the genes of those fish are not passed on. Or maybe more aggressive females that are caught and released suffer physiological stress, resulting in egg resorption and fewer offspring.

In an attempt to learn more, scientists now will interbreed the two populations, with the hope that the offspring will inherit the more aggressive behavior of the fish from unpressured waters.“The findings in this study may be a strong signal that we need to be much more creative in the ways we manage our inland fisheries,” said DEEP’s Robert Jacobs.


I'm field testing some great looking Snag Proof frogs. Sure wish that I had some grass in waters close to home. But as you can see, grass isn't always necessary! Here are some tips from Snag Proof on fishing its baits:

Fish the lures slowly… in most cases, the slower you fish them the better.

Twitch your rod tip frequently, even with lures such as the minnow with built-in action. This breaks up the retrieve and makes the lure behave erratically, often enticing fish strike.

Pause frequently on the retrieve. Let lure settle down, then begin retrieve again. This imitates a live animal cautiously moving through the water. Fish will often hit just at the moment you stop or start the retrieve.

If the fish misses the lure, cast right back to the spot where he struck, he’ll hit again. Same methods work along brushy shorelines and stump-filled inlets. Try it!

Cast lure on top of rocks, stumps, pads, brush or shoreline… let it fall into the water like a lizard, or small animal or bug.

Cast Past the Bass — casting directly to lone stumps, stick-ups or other structures can often startle resting bass lying near the surface. Cast your lure well beyond the structure, then use the pause/retrieve method to bring your lure right past the stick-up for better results.

When fish strikes… hold on! Lower your rod tip and wait 2 seconds, reel ‘til you feel the fish, then strike back! This gives the fish a chance to sort the lure out of the weeds, or moss that it may have grabbed along with the lure. The soft lure body completely fools the fish. They’ll run with it like live bait! Fish won’t spit it out like hard plugs.

Positive Hooking. The Double hook is exposed when the lure is hit from any angle. It won’t turn sideways or pull out like a single hook and weedguard. Keep your hooks sharpened and ready for action.



Grass Carp Gobble Up Lake Austin's Grass, Reputation


Gut contents of a Lake Austin grass carp. Photo by Brent BellingerAs grass carp gobbled up all the aquatic vegetation in Texas’ Lake Austin, they also obliterated the reservoir’s reputation as one of the nation’s top bass fisheries.

“When the grass was around 400 to 500 acres for a couple of years, the bass fishing really took off,” said John Ward, marketing director of the Texas Tournament Zone (TTZ). “The fish were fat and healthy. We had a great sunfish and crawfish population, and plenty of ambush spots for the big girls to grab them.

“Now sunfish and crawfish numbers are significantly down. You see more schools of bass chasing shad balls instead. The worst feeling is when you finally get a big girl, and it’s a 10-pound head with a 5-pound body. They just can’t eat like they used to.”

Understandably frustrated anglers blame mismanagement and/or the powerful influence of lakefront property owners who don’t like hydrilla. For example, one said that Texas Parks and Wildlife (TPW) “grossly overstocked this lake with grass carp.”

He continued, “In less than a year, we have seen complete devastation of this great fishery. The grass is 100 percent gone. Reeds that used to line the lake in places have been uprooted and chewed off at the stalks.”

But the reality is more complex and less malevolent. What happened was the inevitable result of an unavoidable set of circumstances involving weather, two exotic species, and reservoir management priorities.

“This trophy fishery was maintained along with grass carp stockings for many years,” said Texas biologist Marcos De Jesus.

“This extreme drought scenario has thrown a monkey wrench in our management efforts, but we are learning from this experience to avoid a similar outcome in the future.”

Managed by the Lower Colorado River Authority, Austin is a 1,599-acre riverine impoundment on the Colorado River. During normal times, cool discharges into the flow-through fishery combine with a sustained population of grass carp to keep hydrilla in check. Also, less problematic Eurasian watermilfoil thrives, serving as another control. But starting in 2011, drought diminished flow, allowing water to warm and igniting an unprecedented growth spurt in hydrilla. By spring 2013, hydrilla covered nearly a third of the reservoir.

If not kept in check, hydrilla can block flow, pushing water onto highly developed shorelines, De Jesus explained. Consequently, more dramatic control was required, and it could only be done with grass carp. Herbicides are not an option for Austin, which also serves as a municipal water supply.

A stocking of 9,000 carp in May 2013 supplemented 17,000 introduced in 2012, providing 55.5 fish per acre of hydrilla. And, as anglers watched in dismay, the fish quickly gobbled up all of the lake’s aquatic vegetation, except for shoreline plants protected by cages.

“Now we are in a situation where the carp are keeping everything at bay,” said the biologist. “Every time it’s been down to zero, though, it bounces back. We’re now looking at creating habitat (brushpiles) and doing some carp removal.

“Fishing always has been our priority,” he continued, pointing out that electrofishing revealed bass still are plentiful.

“But they’re now suspended in deep water, and people will have to transition to other fishing styles. We were all spoiled. We all loved that lake, and this change was not one that we wanted.”

Brushpiles will help, said Ward, who added that TTZ will help organizes anglers to assist. “But nothing can replace natural habitat. As long as you have 20,000-plus grass carp in a 1,600-acre lake, grass will not grow.

“It’s the aquatic vegetation and the healthy habitat it provides that brings out the potential for big bass in Lake Austin.”

(This article was published originally in B.A.S.S. Times.)


International Bass Fishing Center Location Announced

The International Bass Fishing Center – a multi-functional attraction centering on the world of bass fishing, is being planned for construction in Cullman, Ala., the Board of Director of the Bass Fishing Hall of Fame Board of Directors announced.

The plans were unveiled during the annual Hall of Fame Induction Dinner on the eve of the Geico Bassmaster Classic presented by GoPro in Greenville and on Lake Hartwell, S.C.

Adjacent to I-65 in northern Alabama - the “home state” for bass fishing, the International Bass Fishing Center (IFBC) will be the home of the Bass Fishing Hall of Fame, which honors and describes the accomplishments of those who have made significant contributions to the sport and the bass fishing industry, and much more.

“Within the Center, anglers young and old can immerse themselves in the “Family Fishing Experience” attraction,” said Dr. C. Hobson Bryan, BFHOF board member and professor emeritus at the University of Alabama. “We’ll have fully-stocked ponds for learn-to-fish excursions for area school children, plus we plan on hosting multi-day ‘Fish Camp’ clinics during the summer months.”

The IBFC will include a “Boat and Tackle Showcase” – a living display of the ingenuity and innovation of the bass fishing industry, along with a variety of interactive displays in the Virtual Fishing area, from simulating catching the big one to a ride in a fast, state-of-the-art bass boat.

The “Discovery Center” will enable visitors to experience the watery world of bass first-hand by observing fish behavior in the 36,000 gallon aquarium designed by Acrylic Tank Manufacturing, known throughout the world as the subject of the hit Animal Planet television show "Tanked". Bass fishing professionals and other instructors will demonstrate the latest lures and techniques used successfully on the tournament trail.

With its proximity to such world-class fisheries as Smith Lake and TVA lakes Guntersville, Wheeler, and Wilson, the IBFC will be a tournament headquarters and conference center. According the BFHOF board president Sammy Lee, the location makes it a natural meeting place for fishing industry related events.  These can include national tournament organizations and angling research symposia, as well as bass tournament weigh-ins. The adjacent Cullman Civic Center will enable partnering with the City on a wide range of activities, including non-fishing related events as well.

Currently in the midst of a major fundraising effort – already supported by leading tackle industry names including PRADCO, Zebco, Shimano, G. Loomis, T-H Marine and Strike King, the BFHOF Board anticipates groundbreaking for the IBFC in fall 2016.


About The Hall of Fame -- The Bass Fishing Hall of Fame is a nonprofit organization dedicated to all anglers, manufacturers, tackle dealers, media and other related companies who further the sport of bass fishing. In February 2013 the board of directors announced the completion of a decade-long, exhaustive quest to secure a permanent home with the selection of Cullman, Alabama as the future site of the Hall – and what will now be the International Bass Fishing Center. The IBFC site will be constructed as a joint project with the City of Cullman, Cullman County and the City of Good Hope – a project that includes an adjacent civic/convention center, all of which will be housed on the 110-acre parcel known as the Burrow property. The Hall will enjoy a dedicated 30 acres of the property, which will include ponds, gardens and an aquatic-education center. The entire project is estimated to cost in excess $17 million with structures that will encompass 101,000 square feet. Dependent on fundraising efforts, the BFHOF Board hopes 


Electrofishing Surveys Reveal Virginia's Top Bass Fisheries

Western Branch, Briery Creek, Gatewood, and Pelham rank at the top for largemouth bass populations in Virginia’s four regions, according to recent electrofishing surveys.

“Those lakes ranked at the top will provide excellent opportunities for anglers to catch quality largemouth bass,” said Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VDGIF).

The agency cautioned, however, that “some of the large reservoirs are ranked lower than you might expect. Smaller reservoirs normally have higher sampling efficiency and will thus rank higher based on this evaluation.”

VDGIF based its rankings on the number of bass 15 inches and longer that biologists collected during one hour, as well as relative stock density, which is the proportion of bass in a population  over 8 inches  that are also at least 15 inches.

In Region I, Chesdin, Gardy’s Millpond, Prince, and Chickahominy Lake join Western Branch as the best, while Lake Burton, Smith Mountain, Conner, and Fairystone join Briery Creek in Region II.

For Region III, North Fork Pound Reservoir, Lake Whitten, Rural Retreat, and South Holston rank behind Gatewood, while Germantown, Occoquan, Burke, and Frederick follow Pelham in Region IV.