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Entries in bass tournaments (16)


Thank You, B.A.S.S.

Back in November 1985, the new editor of Bassmaster Magazine, Dave Precht, asked a high school English/journalism teacher to be Senior/Writer Conservation for B.A.S.S. Publications. Thirty years later, I'm proud to say that I remain the first and only conservation writer in the company's history. Most of my articles in the early days appeared in Bassmaster. Today, they're mostly in B.A.S.S. Times or at

B.A.S.S. is a wonderful organization, staffed with remarkable people, and I'm so blessed to be a part of that. As such, I know that anglers, fisheries, and the fishing industry all have benefitted from its existence, often in ways that outsiders can't imagine. I reveal what this company founded by Ray Scott has done for sport fishing in "The B.A.S.S. Factor," an essay in Why We Fish: Reel Wisdom From Real Fishermen.

Here's an excerpt:

In 1970, B.A.S.S. founder Ray Scott gained national attention by filing lawsuits against more than 200 polluters and creating Anglers for Clean Water (ACW), a non-profit conservation arm. One of ACW’s most important contributions for more than a decade was Living Waters, an annual environmental supplement dealing with fishery and water quality issues nationwide.

In 1972, Scott initiated catch-and-release at bass tournaments. Conservation-minded trout anglers had been releasing their fish for decades before that, but it was Scott and B.A.S.S. who generated mass acceptance.

“B.A.S.S. has inspired a lot of young fishermen,” Bill Dance said. “I see it all the time in the mail that I get.

“One little boy talked about catching his first big bass and how good it felt to release that fish. Years ago, that little boy never would have released that fish.”

 Earl Bentz of Triton Boats added that the practice of releasing tournament-caught fish has had a massive ripple effect in salt water. “I remember when they would weigh in blue marlin and throw them n the dump,” he said. “Now most of the tournaments are live-release tournaments, and it all began after B.A.S.S. started promoting catch-and-release.”


Minnesota Allows Culling for Mille Lacs Bass Tournaments

In hopes of attracting larger tournaments that will generate more  revenue for local economies, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) will allow culling of bass at Mille Lacs. It already is legal in other lakes around the state.

"This is one of the ways DNR is actively responding to the economic needs of the Mille Lacs Lake area," said DNR Commissioner Tom Landwehr. "The change has potential economic benefits and will not hurt bass populations."

John Edman, director of Explore Minnesota Tourism, added, "Eliminating one of the hurdles to attracting more national bass fishing tournaments gives the Mille Lacs area another tool to draw national attention and help improve its economy."

The lake already is known nationally as one of the best bass fisheries, especially for smallmouths, with Bassmaster Magazine ranking it 10th in its top 100. But a regulation that forced competitors to keep their first six bass deterred tournament circuits, especially larger ones, from going there.

The rule restricting an angler to one bass of 18 inches or longer remains in effective. But now a tournament fisherman can cull smaller bass until he puts a limit in his livewell. Then he must stop fishing.

"A difference of only a few ounces often determines the winner of a bass tournament," MDNR said. "Having the ability to cull allows tournament anglers to keep the biggest fish that weigh the most."


Michigan Considers Opening Some Waters to Bass Tournaments During Spawn

With catch and release now allowed year around in most state waters, Michigan is considering opening 16 of its fisheries in the lower peninsula to bass tournaments during the spawn.

That means catch-and-delayed-release (CDR) would be permitted for registered tournaments from the last Saturday in April through the Saturday before Memorial Day.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources played host to public meetings about this and other proposed regulation changes during July. In addition, spokesman Nick Popoff said, "We will take input electronically as well for four or five months."

The proposed CDR fisheries would include Lake Charlevoix, Houghton Lake, Burt Lake, Mullett Lake, Hardy Dam Pond, White Lake, Muskegon Lake, Gull Lake, Gun Lake, Kent Lake, Portage Chain, Cass Lake, Half Moon Chain, Pontiac Lake, Wixom Lake, and Holloway Reservoir.

DNR said, "There is a limited biological uncertainty with liberalizing bass seasons. But, it added, "Most U.S. states allow bass fishing during the spawn without negative population impacts. Limiting the lakes will allow the DNR and public to gauge biological and social implications."

The agency also pointed out that local communities "could see economic boosts with more tournament activity."

Michigan had been considering allowing catch and release during the spawn for years, before initiating it this past April. The Michigan B.A.S.S. Nation was at the forefront of a campaign to make it happen.

 "Throughout that time, we had six test lakes, and did a lot of research to determine does CIR (catch-and-immediate-release) negatively affect spawning bass, versus CDR," Popoff said. "All of our research has shown there is no negative impact on spawning bass populations to target and catch those fish and immediately return them to the water." 


Michigan DNR Sets Up Online System for Bass Tournaments

Organizers for bass tournaments in Michigan now can use an online system to schedule their events at state-managed access sites and to report catch results.

According to the Department of Natural Resources (DNR), the Michigan Fishing Tournament Information System will help minimize scheduling conflicts, as directors can view dates for other competitions on specific waterbodies.

In addition to alleviating scheduling concerns, this application will make it easier for directors to share catch data with DNR.

“Fisheries Division encourages bass tournament directors to enter their scheduled tournaments into this system as well as voluntarily contribute their tournament catch results to help us manage Michigan’s bass fisheries,” the agency said.

“The scientific value of tournament catch and effort data will be greater if more tournament directors participate in reporting their bass tournament results. This information will be used by state fisheries biologists, in combination with data from other sources, as a basis for informed fisheries management decisions.”

While organizers must set up an account to schedule events, the general public will be free to check tournament calendars at their favorite access sites.

But the public won’t be able to view catch results, nor will organizers be able to view data other than their own.


Michigan to Start Online Scheduling for Bass Tournaments

Photo by Ron Kinnunen

Beginning Jan. 1, if you want to schedule a bass tournament at a state-managed access site in Michigan, you can do so online. The Michigan Tournament Fishing Information System web application is intended to reduce scheduling conflicts. But it also could improve management of the state’s bass fisheries if organizers will use it to report catch data.

Here’s more from Michigan DNR:

"This system is designed to help both tournament organizers and recreational anglers and boaters avoid ramp conflicts. In addition, tournament organizers can electronically report their catch data and help Fisheries Division effectively manage our valuable fisheries resources.

"By policy, Fisheries Division will not assist nor become involved in promoting fishing tournaments. However, Fisheries Division recognizes that bass tournament catch and effort data can provide important information about bass populations across the state of Michigan."