My Facebook pages

Robert Montgomery

Why We Fish

Fish, Frogs, and Fireflies

Pippa's Canine Corner 

 

 

Loading..
Loading..
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
Loading..
Loading..
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
Loading..
Loading..
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
Loading..
Loading..
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
Get Updates! and Search
No RSS feeds have been linked to this section.

 

 

 

 

Entries in books (227)

Sunday
Jun112017

Activist Angler Writes Book About Dogs

Local fishing expert and award-winning writer Robert Montgomery’s fourth book in less than five years has recently been released.

Unlike his previous books, however, which are mainly about nature, conservation, fishing and the appreciation of nature, “Pippa's Journey: Tail-Wagging Tales of Rescue Dogs” is about dogs, specifically adopted dogs, and highlights the efforts of Farmington Pet Adoption Center (FPAC) and other no-kill shelters.

Pippa’s Journey describes the “often funny, near tragic, and always exciting ride” Montgomery took with his dog during their first four years together. He dedicated the book “to man’s best friend and no-kill animal shelters,” and is donating a portion of the profit from the sale of each book to the Farmington Pet Adoption Center, where he found Pippa in 2013.

Read rest of article in Daily Journal.

Tuesday
Jun062017

You Can't Buy Love, But You Can Adopt It

Pippa's Journey: Tail-Wagging Tales of Rescue Dogs.

Pippa grew up in a shelter. Against all odds, she was adopted at age 2. This is the often funny, near tragic, and inspirational story of her discovery of the outside world.

The book also contains touching stories of other rescue dogs , as well as information about the shelters and why people should consider adopting, especially adult dogs.

It's entertaining, heart-warming, and a great reference book as well!

Pippa's Journey is dedicated to man's best friend, and a portion of the proceeds from sales will be donated to no-kill shelters.

Thursday
Jun012017

B.A.S.S. Celebrates 50th Anniversary of First Tournament

A half-century ago, when Ray Scott of Montgomery, Ala., wanted to entice outdoor media to cover his upcoming press conference, he didn’t soft-sell the event.

He invited the journalists to meet him in Springdale, Ark., and learn about “The Biggest, Most Important Happening In Bass Fishing History.”

The “happening” was the All-American Bass Tournament on Beaver Lake, Arkansas, an event many mark as the beginning of the modern era of bass fishing. The tournament was held June 5-7, 1967 — 50 years ago next week. The tournament was successful enough to launch the professional fishing careers of Bill Dance, Stan Sloan, Don Butler and others, and it inspired Scott, an insurance salesman turned promoter, to conduct a “tournament trail” of events across the country.

And it spawned the Bass Anglers Sportsman Society — B.A.S.S. for short — which would grow into the world’s largest fishing organization with more than 500,000 members and a magazine, Bassmaster, currently read by 4.5 million people each month.

Bassmaster’s June issue marks the milestone of tournament fishing with a cover story written by Bob Cobb, who contributed greatly to the All-American’s success.


In Why We Fish, I documented the  impact that B.A.S.S. has had on every aspect of sport fishing, from tackle, boats, and equipment to conservation and catch-and-release. Here's an excerpt from "The B.A.S.S. Factor":

“I remember a B.A.S. tournament on (Oklahoma’s) Lake Eufaula in the early 1970, when I was in high school,” said B.A.S.S. Conservation Director Gene Gilliland. “Roland Martin won it.

“Afterward, he and Forrest Wood (founder of Ranger Boats) sat out on the dock and talked about how to make livewells better to keep fish alive. The tournament environment, I think, spawned a lot of innovations, especially in boat design and safety features for both the occupants and the fish.

“Maybe they would have shown up anyway eventually,” he continued. “But their development was sped up by tournaments and they became available to the public sooner.”

Kill switches, boat hulls, electronics, trolling motors, trailers, and tow vehicles are but a few additional items that owe their current state of development to B.A.S.S. and its professional anglers. Others include specialized rods, reels, baits, lines, tackleboxes, sunglasses, and clothing.

“If my granddaddy could see the equipment today, he wouldn’t believe it,” Bill Dance said. “He just wouldn’t believe what fishing has become.”

Roland Martin added, “So many of us now are on design staffs. The tackle and marine industry use us for a lot of different things, but especially research and development.”

Sunday
May282017

What Is Life All About? Go Fishing and Find Out

A friend once told me that when his father was questioned or criticized by his non-hunting friends about his fondness for fishing and hunting, he responded that his pursuits had “much more of an ecological integrity and a biological and cultural basis than their golfing or even attendance at professional sporting events.”

Those wise words have led me to the realization that fishing is just as important as a means as it is an end. Yes, fishing is synonymous with relaxation, catching fish, having fun, and spending time with friends and family. Those are all valuable “ends” that make life better.

But fishing also is the means by which we connect with both our humanity and nature as we pursue those ends. In the outdoors, only hunting and possibly farming are comparable.

Sure, running, biking, swimming, and playing tennis are healthful pastimes, as are hiking, kayaking, and a variety of other pursuits in nature. But none of them transport us so completely into the web of life as fishing and hunting. We might no longer fish or hunt to feed our families, but these pastimes takes us closer to what life is all about than anything else I can think of --- except for maybe getting lost in the wilderness or being pursued by a grizzly bear.

And in getting closer to what life is all about, we implicitly recognize our place in it and, as a consequence, are healthier and happier in our everyday existence.

What is life all about? Go fishing and find out.

From Why We Fish. Check it out, along with my other books, at Amazon.

Friday
May192017

Great Reviews for Pippa's Journey at Amazon

5.0 out of 5 stars If you love dogs, you have to read this book!

I really loved this book. It tells the story of the author deciding to give an adult dog in a shelter a chance rather than adopting a puppy. Their story is heartwarming and although Pippa struggled at times to adapt to her new home, with Robert's patience and guidance, she developed a bond with him and is thriving. It also includes stories of other rescued dogs. People who love dogs and know how many wonderful adult dogs are overlooked in shelters will love this book. And hopefully, it will raise awareness for people who are not aware of their plight. Adopt, don't shop!

 

5.0 out of 5 stars For Readers Who Enjoyed "A Dog's Purpose"

I’ve read each of Robert Montgomery’s books, but this book of dog stories is my favorite. The rescued dogs in this book touched my heart and inspired me to always look first at the local shelter before I get a dog. As one of the writers says, “We rescue dogs, and they rescue us.”
Each story in the book celebrates the tangible and intangible blessings of loving lost, abandoned, and homeless dogs who want to share unconditional love, loyalty, and compassion with their humans. Plus, the book contains great information about shelters, adopting dogs, and how to bond with a new canine friend. I highly recommend this book for all animal lovers.