My Facebook pages

Robert Montgomery

Why We Fish

Fish, Frogs, and Fireflies

Pippa's Canine Corner 

 

 

This area does not yet contain any content.
Loading..
Loading..
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
Loading..
Loading..
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
Loading..
Loading..
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
Loading..
Loading..
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
Get Updates! and Search
No RSS feeds have been linked to this section.

 

 

 

 

Entries in conservation (175)

Sunday
Nov272016

Help Kids First Cast, Inc. Pass on the Passion

"At a young age, I was fortunate to have grandparents, parents, uncles, aunts and friends who have shared their passion of fishing with me.  Through the years, this passion for fishing would sustain me through the good and the bad times. It became my “lifeline."  This lifeline brought me experiences that helped give me knowledge, happiness, physical and mental health. But best of all, it allowed me to always learn more about myself."

When I read those words by Diane Aspiazu, president of Kids First Cast, Inc., I knew that we were kindred spirits. Of course, we are not alone. Many of us who fish know this, and that intangible value is what prompted me to write Why We Fish.

But not everyone is doing what Diane and other volunteers up in Idaho are doing to "pass it on," and that is why I encourage you to learn more about this great organization, contribute to it, and think about starting a similar organization in your area.

Recreational fishing is under siege as never before and, if we are to turn the tide we much show those who don't fish--- especially children---- how it can enrich their lives in ways that they can't even imagine until they give it a try and get hooked.

Here is KFCI's mission statement:

Build and sustain healthy communities by providing education, conservation, and outdoor recreation in a safe and inviting environment for kids and their families while enjoying the sport of fishing.

Monday
Nov072016

For the Future of Fishing . . . 

Support these great volunteer organizations that teach about conservation and stewardship and share our love of fishing with kids, families, and those with special needs.

You also can find Kids First Cast, Inc., an Idaho-based organization,  and Fishing's Future, a Texas-based organization, on Facebook.

 

Friday
Nov042016

Idaho Removes Bass from Hawkins Trout Fishery

Using a two-step strategy, Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) hopes that it has removed illegally stocked largemouth bass from little Hawkins Reservoir in the southeastern part of the state.

"There are so many now that, if you walk the shoreline, it is littered with bass," said regional fisheries manager David Teuscher before removal was begun. He added that the introduced species  eats fingerling trout and competes with larger trout for forage.

"We had largemouth bass that were introduced at another location and studies there show that almost every bass tested had a trout in its stomach," the biologist said. 

Bass likely were dumped into the put-and-take trout fishery three or four years ago, and Teuscher estimated that they now outnumber trout 100 to 1.

B.A.S.S. National Conservation Director Gene Gilliland opposes anglers moving fish both because of the illegality and possible consequences to the ecosystem where they are introduced. But for fisheries like Hawkins, where bass are self-sustaining and trout are not, he questioned the bass eradication strategy.

"There are many cases where bass have been put where they do not, and will never belong," he said. "But our world, our climate, our aquatic environments are changing.

"At what point do we conclude that these invasive black bass are indeed better suited and more adaptable to altered environments than are preferred native species that must be maintained with expensive stocking programs?"

One angler, in responding to the plan, said, "I don't get it. Yes, big fish eat little fish, but, as long as people like catching them, what difference does it make? Bass are a fighting sport fish that everyone likes to catch."

At Hawkins, first bag and size limits were removed and anglers encouraged to harvest bass. Then the reservoir was chemically treated to kill remaining fish, and trout stocked two weeks after that.

IDFG estimated that stocked fish won't become "sizable" until the fall of 2017.

 

Monday
Oct242016

Good News for the Arapaima

Conservation efforts are paying off for the arapaima, the world's largest scaled freshwater fish, according to a recent study in Brazil's Amazon River basin.

Here's the important takeaway:

The study looked at protected freshwater lakes along the Juruá River in Brazil, a tributary spanning about 2,081 miles. Efforts to preserve these freshwater ecosystems are often hindered by conflicts with commercial fishing. Patterns of community management accounted for almost 72 percent of the variation in arapaima population sizes across 83 lakes studied along the river. 

Each lake managed by residents had an average of about 305 arapaimas, while open-access lakes had only nine, according to the study.

“What we’re documenting, I think for the first time in a freshwater fishery, is that if you move these lakes from an open-access ‘tragedy of the commons’ to the stewardship of a local community, and you regulate the fishing by bringing in the community-based management, these stocks just go through the roof,” Peres told TakePart. “It’s like if you put your money in a bank account, and it earns not 3 or 4 percent a year but 200 or 300 percent a year.”

Friday
Oct212016

Report Released to Improve Recreational Access for Saltwater Fisheries

Fishing conservation organizations and trade associations recently released recommendations that they hope the incoming Administration and Congress will follow to improve access to saltwater recreational fishing, create economic growth, and enhance the conservation of marine fish stocks.

"While our highly successful model of inland recreational fisheries management is often envied by countries around the world, in many cases federal management of our marine recreational fisheries continues to struggle in meeting the needs of the angling public," said Jeff Crane, president of the Congressional Sportsmen's Foundation.

 "The Vision document provides recommendations that will bring federal fisheries management into the 21st Century, enhancing both the conservation and economic contributions of America's anglers."

A Vision for Marine Fisheries Management in the 21st Century: Priorities for a New Administration recommends a shift away from using the same tools to manage commercial fishing and recreational fishing at the federal level. New approaches should reflect the reality of demand for recreational access to our marine fishery resources, the current economic activity associated with that access, and the scientific data of the light footprint recreational access has on our fishery resources.

 “While progress has been made in recent years to improve saltwater recreational fisheries management, many important opportunities and challenges remain,” said ASA President and CEO Mike Nussman.

 “We look forward to working with the next Administration to fully develop our outdoor economy including embracing the important role that saltwater recreational fishing plays in creating jobs and promoting sustainable enjoyment of our nation’s fisheries resources.”
The report points out antiquated federal policies that have inhibited a vital source of economic growth and a proud American tradition.  It highlights the economic value of recreational fishing in coastal waters. Today, 11 million American anglers fish for recreation in saltwater. From license sales to retail sales, the recreational saltwater fishing industry contributes more than $70 billion annually in economic activity and generates 455,000 jobs.

However, outdated federal management policies threaten to stem this positive economic trend.
“Fishing is a treasured pastime and tradition for millions of Americans and needs to be treated as such,” said Jeff Anglers, president of the Center for Coastal Conservation.

“The new Administration and Congress should take steps to keep this tradition alive – for the benefit of all those who enjoy fishing, for the hundreds of thousands employed in the recreational fishing industry, and for future generations of anglers who will fall in love with the sea.”