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Entries in engines (3)

Thursday
Aug102017

Ethanol-Related Repairs Increasing, According to Survey

A new survey by Boating Industry magazine says those in the boating industry that manufacture, sell, repair and store recreational vessels are seeing a growing number of problems caused by ethanol-related fuels. Said one Minnesota boat dealer in the survey, “Ethanol fuels are great for our service department but bad for our customers!”

The reader survey results, which appear in the magazine’s July 2017 issue, report that 92 percent of survey respondents said “they have seen damage…caused by ethanol…and more business for the service department.” The most recent results are up from 87 percent from a similar survey last year.

The July feature “Ethanol Still a Significant Challenge, Survey Says,” also reported that “more than 15 percent of readers said that based on what they are seeing in their business, more than half of the necessary repairs are being caused by ethanol-related issues.” Eighty-five percent of survey takers were “very concerned” about the use of E15 (fuel containing up to 15 percent ethanol).

Signed into law in 2005, the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) requires an increasing amount of biofuels, such as corn ethanol, to be blended into the gasoline supply. When it was written, the RFS assumed that America’s use of gasoline would continue to grow. Since 2005, however, gasoline usage has actually declined, which today forces more ethanol into each gallon of gas.

To keep up with the RFS mandate, in 2010 the EPA granted a waiver to allow E15 into the marketplace. However, only fuels containing up to 10 percent ethanol (E10) are permitted for use in recreational boats.

For the nation’s largest advocacy, services and safety group, Boat Owners Association of The United States (BoatUS), the survey’s results add to urgency to fix the RFS. Said Manager of Government Affairs David Kennedy, “For the people who know boats best, the readers of Boating Industry magazine who work on boats and keep them running so we can all enjoy a great day on the water, ethanol continues be concern. It will remain this way until we fix America’s broken ethanol policy.”

Go to BoatUS.com/gov/rfs.asp for more information on the Renewable Fuel Standard. BoatUS is a member of the Smarter Fuel Future coalition.

Friday
Jun242016

Look Before You Pump Fuel for Your Marine Engine; Tell EPA More Ethanol Is a Bad Idea

 

Ethanol is a type of alcohol that is frequently used as an additive to gasoline. Unfortunately, it has quickly become a major risk to our nation’s economy and way of life.

Higher concentrations of ethanol in fuel can cause serious mechanical problems in boat and car engines. The added ethanol causes the engines to run at much higher temperatures which increases wear and shortens life. Higher ethanol gas is particularly damaging to small two-stroke engines. In many engines, high ethanol fuels can damage seals and gaskets which increases the possibility of fire and serious engine damage.

Now, the government is pushing for even more ethanol in fuels. E-15, a gasoline blend that is 15% ethanol, is so destructive that insurance carriers will not cover claims and vehicle manufacturers will void warranties for engine damage due to it’s use.

Tell the Environmental Protection Agency that more ethanol is a mistake.

 

Wednesday
Feb232011

Defending Yourself and Your Engine from Ethanol

With E10 (gasoline with 10 percent ethanol) now in widespread use and E15 recently approved, boat owners need to know what their marine engines can handle and how to protect them from the introduction of a fuel containing ethanol alcohol.

 

Captain Steve Chaconas, offers the following advice:

Working its way into gas tanks for several years, ethanol is wreaking havoc for boat owners!

E10 already has damaged thousands of older engines, and only the newest engines were designed to use gasoline containing 10 percent ethanol.  Using greater concentrations may void engine warranties, damage motors and fuel systems, and potentially lead to significant safety issues.

Continued