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Entries in fisheries management (86)


TrophyCatch Boasts Nearly 3,000 Entries as Season Three Ends

As the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC)  wraps up season three of TrophyCatch, nearly 3,000 trophy largemouth bass heavier than 8 pounds have been caught, documented, and released in Florida.

Thanks to TrophyCatch’s corporate partners, led by Bass Pro Shops, Phoenix Boats and Experience Kissimmee, anglers  reap rewards for taking time to document and release these fish so they may be caught again, as well as help FWC learn more about enhancing and sustaining the most popular fishery in the world.

Each angler who catches a bass weighing more than 8 pounds, documents the weight, and releases it alive is eligible to earn prizes, starting with $100 in gift cards from Bass Pro Shops, a custom certificate and decal, as well as other prizes. Check out  to register, submit catches and review the rules and prizing details, which increase in value for larger bass. For most anglers, qualifying is as simple as taking a photo of the entire bass, head-to-tail, on a scale, so the weight can be seen and submitting it to the website. Tournament anglers also may participate by providing a link to official published results.

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Texas' ShareLunker Program begins 30th season

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“In season three alone, we documented more than 1,700 trophy-size bass caught and released in Florida to continue growing, spawning, and challenging anglers,” said Tom Champeau, director of the FWC’s Division of Freshwater Fisheries Management.

Included were 14 Hall of Fame bass, each weighing more than 13 pounds. Each of those 14 anglers will receive a hand-painted replica of his catch (a $500 value), as well as $200 in gift cards from Bass Pro Shops, and other prizes.

Although all bass must have been caught between Oct. 1, 2014, and Sep. 30, 2015, to be included in the season three competition, anglers have until Oct. 15 to get their catches submitted and approved. The annual champion will then be announced and the Championship Ring, provided by the American Outdoors Fund, will be presented. The current leader is Seth Chapman, who caught, documented, and released a 15-pound, 11-ounce Florida largemouth on March 15 in Kingsley Lake, Clay County. This is the same semi-private lake in Florida that yielded the season two champion bass.

Every angler who registers, free of cost, at  is entered into an annual drawing for a $40,000 bass boat package. Phoenix boats donated a 619 Pro, powered by Mercury Marine, and equipped with a Power-Pole shallow-water anchoring system. In addition, every time an angler has a TrophyCatch verified and approved, he or she earns 10 more chances to win the boat.

Check out Facebook to see who the finalists are for this year’s random drawing and to learn when and where the boat will be given away.

“TrophyCatch has caught on with anglers from around the state and the world,” said K.P. Clements, TrophyCatch director. “We still have trophy bass that were caught and released but not documented because anglers did not have a suitable scale or camera to verify the weight, failed to get the required photograph, or didn’t yet know about the program. But we are finding out that more and more anglers are making sure they’re ready to document and submit their catch when they land a TrophyCatch-size bass.”

All of this activity helps achieve TrophyCatch goals, which are to preserve these valuable trophy fish, learn how to enhance their abundance, and promote recreational fishing.


Along With Bass, Alligator Gar Population Booming at Falcon

TPWD technicians Jimmy Cordova (left) and John Ingle remove a Falcon alligator gar from gillnet during a sampling study that led to increased limit. TPWD photos

Booming populations of largemouth bass and alligator gar give anglers two good reasons to fish Falcon Reservoir.

Above average rainfall in spring 2014 and 2015, following low water levels for several years prior, is sparking a resurgence of the bass population, said Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) Inland Fisheries biologist Randy Myers.

“The low water allowed for jungle-like growth of huisache, mesquite, acacia and retama on the exposed reservoir bottom,” he said. “The water level increase inundated that terrestrial growth, resulting in the formation of strong year classes of bass.”

TPWD annually stocks Falcon with around half a million Florida largemouth bass to enhance the production of large fish. Stocking plus strong natural spawns in 2004 and 2005 following the last water level rise led to a boom that lasted from 2008 until 2011. During that time winning tournament weights for a five-fish limit typically exceeded 40 pounds, and Falcon was named the best bass lake in the nation by Bassmaster magazine in 2012.

Myers said 8- to 14-inch bass are currently very abundant in Falcon, and those fish will grow rapidly over the next several years. Myers expects Falcon’s largemouth bass population to peak again in 2017—2019.

“Now is the time to do your homework on Falcon and learn where and how to fish it,” he said. “Falcon is a big reservoir—more than 80,000 acres when full—and it pays to have a game plan in place before you go fishing.”

Adele Myers, age 7, with a 70-inch, 88-pound alligator gar that she caught on a jug line baited with a 12-inch freshwater drum. She is the daughter of TPWD biologist Randy Myers, who said that she also caught the drum.

While you are looking for the best places to fish for bass, Myers suggests that you try your luck with alligator gar as well. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission raised the limit on alligator gar on Falcon to five fish per day and 10 in possession effective Sept. 1.

The alligator gar population in Falcon is doing well, and based upon scientific data, is able to sustain itself with the increased bag limit.  Female alligator gar in Falcon are attaining 100 pounds in 7-10 years and the lake record weighing 249 pounds was taken in 2014.  While having a 10-pound bass on the end of your line is exciting, battling a gar that could be 100 pounds or bigger can give you quite a thrill and make for some very special memories and photographs.

Since you can target alligator gar using different means of take, it is important to know that harvested gar can make for some fine table fare. 

“Anglers pursue gar with archery equipment, rod and reel, and jug lines on Falcon, and the meat is white, non-oily and not fishy tasting,” Myers said. “It’s quite popular with locals, who call it catan.


Are We Making Bass Lazy?

Anglers may be influencing the evolution of bass and the consequences do not look promising, according to a ground-breaking study by the Department of Natural Resources and the Environment (DNRE) at the University of Connecticut.

“This scenario genetically favors the fish with lower metabolisms, the fish that are less likely to be caught by anglers,” said researcher Jason Vokoun. “It suggests that we may be permanently changing exploited fish populations over the long term.”

And what we might be changing them into are the aquatic equivalent of couch potatoes, fish not as likely to be caught because they are less aggressive.

The potential for recreational fishing to act as an evolutionary force is well established as a theory, according to the university. “But this is the first study to identify outcomes of selection from recreational fishing of wild populations using unfished populations as reference,” it said.

In the study funded by the state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP), scientists collected young bass from fished and unfished lakes. After being tagged to identify their places of origin, the fish were released into protected waters. A year later, researchers collected them and measured their resting metabolisms.

They found that a significantly higher number of fish taken from the lakes where fishing was allowed had lower metabolic rates than bass from unfished waters. “This results point to a reduction in the type of behavior that is so prized by anglers,” said Jan-Michael Hessenauer, a doctoral student.

Why is this happening? Scientists aren’t as certain about that. Possibly nests guarded by more aggressive males fail more often because those fish are caught, and, as a consequence, the genes of those fish are not passed on. Or maybe more aggressive females that are caught and released suffer physiological stress, resulting in egg resorption and fewer offspring.

In an attempt to learn more, scientists now will interbreed the two populations, with the hope that the offspring will inherit the more aggressive behavior of the fish from unpressured waters.“The findings in this study may be a strong signal that we need to be much more creative in the ways we manage our inland fisheries,” said DEEP’s Robert Jacobs.


Florida's Red Snapper Season Reopens Sept. 5

Florida's recreational red snapper season for Gulf state waters reopens to harvest Labor Day weekend, Sept. 5-7, and will continue to be open for Saturdays and Sundays in September and October with the last day of harvest being Sunday, Nov. 1.

At its April 16 meeting in Tallahassee, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) approved a 70-day recreational red snapper season in Gulf state waters. The 2015 season started the Saturday before Memorial Day (May 23) and ran through July 12. The reopening of red snapper season for Labor Day weekend and weekends in September and October will give anglers additional fishing opportunities in the fall.

Red snapper is a popular species that has a strong economic impact for many coastal communities throughout Florida. State waters in the Gulf are from shore to 9 nautical miles. Federal waters extend from where state waters end out to about 200 nautical miles.

Anglers targeting red snapper from a private boat (excluding Monroe County) need to sign up for the Gulf Reef Fish Survey prior to fishing. Sign up at a local retail store, tackle shop or tax collector’s office; by calling 1-888-FISHFLORIDA(347-4356); or online at

For more information on Gulf red snapper, visit and click on “Saltwater,” “Recreational Regulations” and “Gulf Snapper.” Learn more about the Gulf Reef Fish Survey, including how to sign up, by visiting and click on “Saltwater,” “Recreational Regulations” and “Gulf Reef Fish Survey.”


Are Anglers, Hunters Endangered Species In Minnesota, As Well As California?

Slowly, but inevitably, anglers and hunters are becoming endangered species in California, the most Leftist state in the nation.  Based on an editorial that I read in the Minneapolis Star-Tribune, I fear that Minnesota's anglers and hunters might not be far behind, despite the state being the "land of ten thousand lakes."

While many Democrats do fish and hunt, Leftist ideology is anti-fishing and anti-hunting both directly and indirectly. Directly it takes the form of many preservationist and animal rights groups, which want to restrict access to public lands and waters, as well as ban fishing and hunting outright. Indirectly it manifests as a nanny-state bureaucracy which over-regulates and over-taxes.

For example, California fishing licenses cost an average of 76 percent more than in other states, according to the California Sportfishing League. It's no surprise, then, that fishing license sales have dropped nearly 55 percent since 1980, even as the population has increased from 23 to 38 million.

Now, to Minnesota, which, sad to say, was turning Left before this editorial. Just last year, a Democrat state senator proposed and the legislature approved changing the name "Asian carp" to "invasive carp" so as not to offend the state's Asian population. If that's not a sign that the state has fallen into the PC rabbit hole, I don't know what is.

Here is the headline for the editorial, written, it seems, by people who learned about the outdoors solely through Disney movies: "From hunting to fishing, humans are doing damage as 'super predators.'"

And here are a couple of choice excerpts from the editorial, which was prompted by a study: 

"The upshot is that humans have evolved into 'super predators' unwilling or unable to maintain the natural equilibrium. All manner of 'normal' human activity — including global trade, fossil-fuel subsidies, food processing, and recreational hunting and fishing — contribute to failing ecosystems worldwide."

"Scientists said last week that global warming caused by human emissions has exacerbated the severity of the current California drought by 20 percent. Scientists in Minnesota have said repeatedly that agricultural practices and suburban-style development are helping to destroy the state’s cherished lakes. We’ve met the enemy, and the enemy is us."

Here's something that might be pertinent and that the Star-Tribune staff obviously has no clue about: Recreational fishing and commercial fishing are NOT the same thing. And recreational anglers do far more to sustain and enhance fisheries than they do to damage them. This includes catch-and-release, which has become almost universal, as well as millions of dollars contributed annually by anglers for fisheries management and conservation via license fees, excise taxes on equipment, and private contributions to fishery groups.

And that global warming thing? Yes, the climate is changing. It always has, and always will. But it is a disturbing indication of the lunacy of the newspaper's editorial staff, and possibly an indictment of readers in Minnesota that "global warming caused by human emissions" is presented as fact. It is not fact. No quantifiable evidence exists to support that statement.

The best part of finding that editorial was reading a lengthy comment from at least one Minnesota resident who has not fallen into the Leftist abyss. Here are some excerpts:

"License fees and contributions collected from hunters and hunting advocacy groups (Ducks Unlimited, Pheasants Forever, Ruffed Grouse Society) account for most of the wildlife conservation dollars spent in this state." 

"The hunters I associate with are ethical. We won't take the shot unless we are certain it will result in the most humane kill possible. We'll never kill something that doesn't end up on the dinner table (coyotes being the only exception) and we never kill more than we need."

"I'm also a landowner. I manage my property to benefit all wildlife. I leave my corn and soybeans standing over winter to provide winter food for deer. I've planted countless trees, shrubs and grasses that benefit birds, mammals and pollinators."

"It's obvious that the authors of this study have a confirmation bias. It reads like it was commissioned by PETA." 

And it's obvious that the editorial staff of the Star-Tribune has that same bias.