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Entries in IGFA (16)

Monday
Apr102017

Rapala Lures Claimed Most World Records in 2016

Rapala doesn’t just have a rich history, it makes history. More International Game Fish Association world-record fish were caught in 2016 on Rapala lures than on any other brand of baits, again. Among the 14 new IGFA world-record fish caught on Rapala baits last year was a 47 lb. 8 oz. Papuan Black Snapper.

In fact, more IGFA world-record fish have been caught on Rapalas than on any other lure brand in history – more than 500.

“We are pleased and proud that, once again, more world records were caught on Rapala lures in 2016 than any other brand of lures,” says Rapala USA President Tom Mackin. “All over the world, big fish eat little fish that swim like a Rapala. It proves that with Rapala, any angler has a shot at catching a world-record fish.”

Rapala is the first and only lure manufacturer to receive an IGFA Lifetime Achievement Award.

Rapala lures are sold in 140 countries. Anglers have caught world-record catches with them on every continent except Antarctica.

More World Records
Rapala scales determined the weight of 124 IGFA world-record catches in 2016, including a 52 lb. 9 oz. tope shark landed on 6-lb-test line.

Nine new world-record fish were caught in 2016 on Sufix fishing line, including a 188 lb. 3 oz. tarpon in the junior-angler category. Storm baits yielded a new IGFA world-record catch as well. Sufix and Storm are among the many respected names in the Rapala family of brands.

About Rapala
Rapala was unofficially founded in 1936 when Lauri Rapala invented the first Rapala fishing lure. Rapala has grown from humble beginnings to a market leader in the fishing tackle industry. The Rapala brand’s functionality and high quality are known by fishermen around the world. Rapala maintains its strict standards of craftsmanship while delivering its fishing products to anglers in more than 130 countries.

About IGFA
The IGFA is a not-for-profit organization committed to the conservation of game fish and the promotion of responsible, ethical angling practices through science, education, rule making and record keeping.

Thursday
Feb162017

That's Not a Goby . . . THIS Is a Goby!

Fish in the top photo is a round goby, an exotic fish introduced to the Great Lakes in the ballast water of ocean-going ships. They grow to about 6 inches maximum, but 3 to 4 inches is the norm. Also, they have proven to be among the favorite forage for smallmouth bass, and anecdotal evidence suggests that they are growing faster and larger on a goby diet.

Fish in the bottom photo is the world record marbled goby, caught in Thailand by John Merritt. It checked in at 5 pound, 3 ounces. IGFA says that it is "likely the largest of gobies." And with a mouth like that, it likely could turn the tables on some of those smallmouth bass that are eating its smaller, globe-trotting cousin.

You can see more "weird world records" at Sport Fishing.

The International Sport Fishing Association (IGFA) is the official record keeper for both fresh and saltwater species. You can see the full list here. For line class records and additional information, you must become a member.

Friday
Aug122016

Monster Muskie! Was It a World Record?

 

This muskie might have been a world record--- or very close to it. But we'll never know.

The anglers who caught it, Canadians Tom and Tim Berger,  photographed, quickly measured it, and released it into Lake Huron's North Channel on the Ontario border.

"We've seen and caught a lot of big fish up there, but nothing like this," said Tim.

The monster muskellunge measured 60 inches long, with a girth of 31 inches. To put that into perspective, the International Game Fish Association's all-tackle world record muskie checked in at 67-8 pounds, measuring 60 1/4 inches long and 33 1/2 inches in girth.

“This fish was so thick all the way back to the tail. We couldn’t bend it  to get it in the net completely," Tom said.

Often targeting big fish, the two also have caught a 54-inch muskie in Lake St. Clair.

“I’ve caught a lot of muskies. We’ve caught several in the 50-inch range,” Tim said. “I’ve never seen or had one this large up there. It was the fish of a lifetime for us.”

In Minnesota, meanwhile, Robert Hawkins caught a 57-inch muskellunge on a fly last November at Lake Mille Lacs. It also was measured, photographed, and released.

“I didn’t see the fish take the fly,’’ said Hawkins, who owns Bob Mitchell’s Fly Shop in Lake Elmo. “But when I felt her hit, I had a pretty good strip-set, I thought. Then, when I saw her turn sideways, I knew she was the biggest muskie I’d ever hooked.’’

Tuesday
Jun232015

Possible World Record Seatrout Caught in Florida

Florida Today photo

Must be a nice snook, thought Luke Ledbetter of Boaz, Alabama, holding tight as line ripped from his spinning reel.

Suppose it could be a redfish, he concluded, upon seeing the broad headwake the fish pushed as it neared the boat.

A 3-foot seatrout? No way.

"I had no idea speckled trout got that big," said Ledbetter, after Captain Peter Deeks of Merritt Island gently scooped up the trout with a homemade, sling-style landing net.

With the trout cradled beside the boat, Deeks took measurements. Growing up and guiding on the Space Coast, Deeks knows a truly big trout when he sees one.

"Every so often we'll catch a fish that really impresses me, and this one did," said Deeks, who runs Native Sons Fishing Guides. "I've caught longer fish before, but the girth on this one was just incredible."

The trout taped out at 34.25 inches, or 87 centimeters. The International Game Fish Association's record for length currently stands at 79 centimeters. Pending approval, Ledbetter's spotted seatrout will be recognized by the IGFA's new All-Tackle Length record program, which awards catches based on length rather than weight and requires that fish be released alive and in good health.

They kept the fish out of the water for just moments to measure it and snap a few photos. They did not weigh it, but Deeks estimates the trout weighed about 14 pounds.

"The largest trout I've ever weighed was a 33-inch trout that was 13.9 pounds, but this one was even fatter," Deeks said. "But I hate weighing them, hate hanging them by the jaw. They're really sensitive fish."

After documenting the catch, Deeks immediately called the IGFA to report the catch.

Read more at Florida Today.

Wednesday
May202015

Florida Angler Sets State Record for Flier Panfish

Twila Gates set a Florida freshwater fishing record earlier this month.  Her catch of a 1-pound, 5.6-ounce (1.35 pounds) flier on May 9 from a Jackson County pond beat the old record of 1.24 pounds. It had a length of 12 inches and a girth of 11.8 inches. The previous state record came from Lake Iamonia near Tallahassee, in 1992.

“If Gate’s flier is submitted to the International Game Fish Association, it could also could become the new world record,” said the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC).  Anglers from North Carolina and Georgia hold the current world record jointly with a pair of 1-pound, 4-ounce submissions.

Gates has been fishing with her father since she was a little girl and has passed her love of the outdoors on to her son, Jantzen, 15. On the Saturday before Mother’s Day, she was fishing from a johnboat with her son and his friend, William Hinson, at a 15-acre cypress pond. She caught the flier on a Shakespeare micro-spin and 6-pound P-Line, using a white grub beetle-spin, at about 4:30 p.m. Hinson thought it was a record and looked it up online and called the regional office.

Chris Paxton, an FWC fisheries biologist, met her to verify the species and carefully measure and weigh the fish on certified scales.

Fliers are probably one of the lesser-known freshwater fish in Florida. They are native and typically found in somewhat heavily vegetated ponds and backwater sloughs, such as the pond where Gates caught this one.

In addition to the record flier, she caught four other nice-sized fliers and the boys added two 10-pound plus trophy bass.

The FWC has several freshwater angler recognition programs including state records, Big Catch, and TrophyCatch.

State records require a biologist to verify the species and have a certified weight for the notarized application. The FWC maintains records for 33 freshwater species.

Big Catch is a long-standing, family-friendly angler recognition for those same 33 species. It recognizes anglers with a certificate if they qualify by submitting a photo of their catch online and if the catch exceeds specified weights or lengths. There are youth, specialist, master and elite angler awards as well. People can learn more at BigCatchFlorida.com.

TrophyCatch is the newest citizen-science conservation rewards program. By catching, documenting and releasing a largemouth bass heavier than eight pounds anglers earn rewards starting with $100 in Bass Pro Shops gift cards, recycle their catch and provide valuable information for conservation biologists. Anglers should be sure to register at TrophyCatchFlorida.com and read the rules, so they will be ready to document their next trophy bass with a photo of the fish on a scale and submit it for rewards. Just registering enters people in a drawing for a Phoenix bass boat powered by Mercury.

“In one day of fishing, right here in the Fishing Capital of the World, Ms. Gates, her son and his friend were on the verge of qualifying for all three programs ─ and topped it off with a potential world record. That is a happy Mother’s Day weekend for a young lady devoted to her son and the outdoors,” said Tom Champeau, director of the Division of Freshwater Fisheries Management.