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Entries in invasive species (250)

Friday
Oct272017

Canadians Say Asian Carp Are In Lake Huron

Canadians are saying that they have conclusive evidence that Asian carp now are in Lake Huron. Considering that lake's central location among, that would mean the invaders have easy access  to Lakes Michigan, Erie, and Superior, although the latter might be too infertile and cold for them to thrive there.

Or, if this report is true, carp already could be in Michigan and moved into Huron from there.

Still, this also could be much ado about nothing in terms of the Asian carp that post the greatest threat to the Great Lakes. Those are bighead and silver.

In Canada, grass carp also are commonly referred to as Asian. While they certainly would not be a welcome addition to the lakes, they don't pose the threat to the sport fishery that the other two do. Grass carp feed on aquatic vegetation, which would diminish beneficial fish habitat. But they don't quickly dominate a water body as the other two do.

Bighead and silver, meanwhile, are filter feeders, gobbling up phytoplankton and zooplankton, the base of the food chain for the young of most sport fish, as well important food for shad and other native filter feeders. Also they are prolific, growing large quickly and crowding out other species with their numbers and mass.

Here's one of the Canadian articles about the discovery:

A delegate to last week’s Coastal Municipal Forum says there is now conclusive evidence that Asian Carp are now in Lake Huron.

Dave Myett, a councillor with Saugeen Shores, says the Ministry of Natural Resources has told them they’re able to test the water and determine what kind of fish has passed through by the presence of their DNA. And they say they have found the presence of Asian Carp DNA.

Myett says at this point they can’t tell how many there were or their size. He points out they’re a very elusive species so anyone that either finds a dead one or catches one should notify the ministry.

Myett also points out that given their size and they’ll ability to procreate once they reach a body of water they eventually out eat and dominate other species.

The forum was hosted by the Lake Huron Centre for Coastal Conservation

“We have been led to believe by the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry that there is conclusive evidence that the DNA has been detected of the Asian Carp in Lake Huron,” says Myett. “They can test the water at the source points and they can tell what kind of fish has passed through there by telling if the DNA is present in the water.”

“They seem to be an elusive species,” says Myett. “They’re rarely seen on the shoreline or caught. They’re very hard to catch. If someone finally finds a dead one or catches one in a net or fishing, then I’m sure the Ministry would very much like to hear about it.”

Friday
Oct202017

Virus May Be Way To Control Carp, Mussels, Other Exotic Species

University of Minnesota researchers may be able to use a recent fish virus outbreak to combat an invasive species plaguing state lakes.

Researchers with the university's Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center are studying Koi herpesvirus to see if it can be used to control the invasive carp population, Minnesota Daily reported.

"We want to find ways to kill carp and zebra mussels and all these invasive species," said MAISRC Director Nick Phelps. "We started this particular project in 2014 — went two years and didn't see (the virus) anywhere, then saw it in seven to eight lakes in a matter of a month and a half."

 

The center first confirmed a naturally-occurring case of the virus in early August. Researchers confirmed several more cases in early October.

Carp have been in the area for more than 180 years and can disturb lake environments, said Isaiah Tolo a first-year doctoral student with the research center.

"It's a big problem here," Tolo said.

Phelps said his team hopes to release the virus into Minnesota lakes to stop the spread of invasive carp. Koi fish are a subspecies of common carp so they're both susceptible to the virus. The disease won't harm other fish because it specifically targets carp, he said.

"We've never found it in a walleye, musky or bait fish," Phelps said.

Phelps said Australian researchers have spent a decade looking into bio-control to eliminate carp. Australian researchers plan to release the virus into the environment next year, he said.

"It'll be the first time that pathogens will be used for aquatic animal control," he said. "They're pushing the envelope a bit, so we're sitting back and learning what we can from that experiment."

Tuesday
Oct032017

Challenge Takes Bite Out Of Lionfish Threat To Fisheries

Recreational participants removed 8,901 lionfish, and  commercials took 15,800 pounds (about 17,420 lionfish) in the 2017 Lionfish Challenge, sponsored by Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). That's 26,321 exotic predators eliminated.

Ken Ayers Jr. of Panama City took home the recreational Lionfish King award with a total of 1,250 lionfish harvested. Joshua Livingston of Destin became Florida’s first Commercial Champion for his efforts in removing 4,560 pounds of lionfish (poundage equates to about 5,027 fish). On top of other prizes earned throughout the Challenge, the two winners were presented with a custom-made Fish Bone Design trophy and a “No Shoes Reefs” Engel 85 cooler.

A total of 120 recreational and commercial harvesters participated in the statewide lionfish removal incentive program, which ran from Lionfish Removal and Awareness Day May 20 (first Saturday after Mother’s Day annually) through Sept. 4.

FWC's partners in this effort included  34 dive shops that served as checkpoints for recreational submissions, as well as Engel Coolers, ZombieStickz Lionfish Eliminator and Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium.

"While this year’s Lionfish Challenge may be over, there are still plenty of other great programs that encourage lionfish removal," FWC said.

Check out the new  Reef Rangers website, which launched in early September. Participants who adopt a reef soon will receive a Reef Rangers Lionfish Control Team T-shirt and tank sticker.

Learn more about lionfish  at MyFWC.com/Lionfish.

Wednesday
Aug162017

Largemouth Stocked as Smallmouth Killed at Elkhead Reservoir

The war on bass in the West has taken a conciliatory turn in Colorado, at least. Responding to public outcry at the possible loss of the warmwater fishery in Elkhead Reservoir, Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) and volunteers with boats stocked 120 largemouth bass, weighing 3 to 6 pounds each, during June.  

Earlier in the year, 125,000 fry were added to the fishery in northwest Colorado, while 680 yearlings were released in 2016, the first bass legally stocked in the fishery since the 1980s.

"We are increasing stocking for more opportunities for anglers to catch alternative species in place of the species that we are trying to reduce for downstream management," said CPW biologist Tory Ayre.

Meanwhile, CPW also sponsored a June 24-July 2 tournament, offering financial incentives for anglers to remove as many smallmouth bass and northern pike from the Yampa River impoundment as possible.

What's going on? Why stock largemouth bass and kill smallmouth? Resource managers believe that the latter and pike escape over the spillway and threaten recovery of four federally endangered species: humpback chub, bonytail, Colorado pikeminnow and razorback sucker. CPW is mandated by law to protect those native fish.

Initially, biologists considered poisoning the 900-acre reservoir and restocking with more desirable species. But opposition from local anglers convinced them to take another approach, which includes a net across the spillway, an annual "kill tournament" for smallmouth and pike, and stocking with largemouth, bluegill, and crappie.

"It's great, we appreciate the CPW's help," said volunteer Norm Fedde. "We know they are for the sportsmen, but the federal government is not."

For the week-long tournament, which has no entry fee, CPW tagged one smallmouth bass and one pike, each worth $1,500. Additionally, the agency gave $750 each to the anglers who caught the most of each species, as well as a variety of daily prizes.

To the south, meanwhile, CPW sponsored the third annual "kill" tournament for smallmouth bass July 7-30 at Ridgway Reservoir in Ridgway State Park. The fish were illegally introduced there about a decade ago, and also pose a risk of escaping into rivers to threaten native species.

"A primary mission of Colorado Parks and Wildlife is to work to sustain native species," said John Alves, senior aquatic biologist for CPW's Southwest Region. "Colorado's anglers contribute significantly to our work and we greatly appreciate their support in helping us to maintain the state's fisheries."

Tuesday
Aug012017

More than 5,000 Lionfish Removed From Florida Waters

Already this year, more than 5,000 invasive lionfish have been removed from Florida waters as part of the annual  campaign that runs from Lionfish Removal and Awareness Day on May 20 and ends Sept. 4.

"There’s still plenty of time to compete in this year’s Lionfish Challenge," said the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

"Over 5,000 lionfish have been removed from Florida waters thanks to the program, including nearly 3,700 recreational fish removals and more than 1,200 pounds commercially (equates to about 1,400 fish)."

The challenge rewards lionfish harvesters with prizes such as T-shirts, tumblers, heat packs for stings, pole spears, an extra spiny lobster per day during the two-day sport season, and much more. It only takes 25 lionfish (or 25 pounds commercially) to qualify for the program and the more lionfish you enter, the more prizes you will receive. Plus, all participants are entered into a raffle to win even more prizes such as Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium gift bags, ZombieStickz pole spears and customized ZooKeeper Lionfish Containment Units.

The persons with the most lionfish at the end of the competition will be crowned the Lionfish King or Queen (recreational category) and the Commercial Champion at the Lionfish Safari tournament in St. Petersburg the weekend of Sept. 9.

To find out how to participate in the challenge, go here.