Get Updates! and Search
No RSS feeds have been linked to this section.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Entries in invasive species (209)

Thursday
Apr302015

Florida Plans Lionfish Removal and Awareness Day

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) will celebrate its first Lionfish Removal and Awareness Day wtih a weekend of events across the state, starting Saturday, May 16, including a festival in Pensacola.

Lionfish Removal and Awareness Day (established to be the first Saturday after Mother’s Day each year) was created by FWC Commissioners to help draw attention to the lionfish issue. Lionfish are a nonnative, invasive species that have a potential negative impact on native species and habitat.

“We are thankful to all the groups that helped organize the Lionfish Removal and Awareness Day Festival and Tournament in Pensacola as well as all those who are hosting their own events across the state,” said FWC Commissioner Bo Rivard. “These efforts will help ensure we keep the lionfish issue on the forefront of everyone’s thoughts and minds.”

The FWC encourages all divers to remove as many lionfish on the weekend of May 16-17, no matter where they are in Florida.

The FWC also will unveil its Reef Ranger program this same weekend.

 Lionfish Removal and Awareness Day Festival and Tournament, Pensacola at Plaza de Luna, 900 S. Palafox St., Pensacola, on May 16-17.

This event will include celebrity chef demonstrations, lionfish tastings, fillet demos, a visit from world famous artist and marine conservationist Guy Harvey, family-friendly activities such as games and a fountain to play in, and more than 40 art, diving and conservation vendors; there will also be music, food and tons of helpful lionfish information.

The festival starts at 10 a.m. and runs until 5 p.m. each day. Updates will be provided from various other events across the state.

Want to participate in the tournament? Visit the Gulf Coast Lionfish Coalition (GCLC) webpage at Gulfcoastlionfish.com/lionfish_events to learn more or visit its Facebook page at Facebook.com/gulfcoastlionfishcoalition. GCLC is offering prize money for a number of categories, as well as chances to win great prizes with raffle tickets. Come by to check out the researchers counting and filleting fish. 

Meanwhile . . . 


The exotic lionfish is spreading up the Atlantic coast and along the Gulf coast, as well as throughout the Caribbean. A potential world record recently was caught off the coast of Mississippi.

Wednesday
Apr292015

Survey Reveals Carp DNA Throughout Chicago Waterway System

If Asian carp aren’t in the Great Lakes, they can’t get much closer. Sampling of the Chicago Area Waterway System (CAWS) last fall revealed carp eDNA throughout the system, including near a lock in downtown Chicago, just one block from Lake Michigan.

“Prevention needs to happen now and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and other key decision-makers should take swift action,” said the non-profit Alliance for the Great Lakes (AGL), which charges that the Corps lacks direction, as revealed in its Great Lakes-Mississippi River Interbasin Study.

“DNA evidence is an early detection tool to understand the potential movement of carp, and testing results have consistently found DNA hits on a path closer and closer to the Great Lakes over the past several years of testing,” the group added.

The Corps report outlined eight possible ways to stop migration of Asian carp into the Great Lakes, with the most expensive being an $18.3 billion separation of the CAWS from Lake Michigan. Meanwhile, the Alliance supports measures to temporarily reduce risk, including construction of a new channel and control technologies in the approach to Brandon Road lock and research on reconfiguration of locks in general.

But long-term issues with Chicago’s water system infrastructure must be addressed to keep the carp out, emphasized Jennifer Caddick, AGL spokesperson.

“It’s complicated. You can’t just build one dam and solve the whole problem,” she said. “There’s a lot of work to be done, but we need intensive focus.”

If/when Asian carp become established in the Great Lakes, consequences could be catastrophic for the multi-billion-dollar sport fishery. That’s because the exotic fish are fast-growing, prolific, plankton eaters. They likely would outcompete the many young and adult native fishes that rely on phytoplankton and zooplankton for their primary forage.

Additionally, the U.S. Geological Survey has identified 22 rivers in the U.S. portion of the Great Lakes that would provide suitable spawning habitat for Asian carp.

Sunday
Apr192015

Largemouth Bass Chow Down on Bighead Carp in Lab Tests

Bighead carp grow large. But bass eat them when they're smalll and more vulnerable

“Asian carp” actually refers to two species of exotic fish, not one. As they spread throughout the nation’s rivers, both pose threats to native fisheries.

As it turns out, though, there seems to be a big difference in their vulnerability to predation. That’s bad news for bighead carp, which grow larger, feed more exclusively on zooplankton, and are less abundant. And good news for the smaller silver carp, which have become infamous for endangering boaters with their leaping antics.

Researchers at the Illinois Natural History Museum and University of Illinois put small samples of both into experimental pools, along with bluegill, gizzard shad, and golden shiners. Largemouth bass in those pools ate more bighead carp than any other species, including silver carp. Scientists hypothesized that this may mean that young silver carp are more “street smart” than their bighead cousins.

While it’s good to know that bass can and likely do eat these invaders, especially bighead carp, whether this predation will help control them remains to be seen.

“Although new research is confirming that native fish can and do consume Asian carp, this not mean that all is well,” cautioned the Michigan State University Extension (MSUE). “In the LaGrange Reach of the Illinois River, at least seven native fish are preying on Asian carp. Even so, this reach has one of the highest densities of silver carp recorded anywhere in the world.

“Native plankton-eating fish like gizzard shad and bigmouth buffalo have declined and the long-term effects on gamefish are still uncertain.”

In 2008, biologists estimated more than 5,000 silver carp per mile in that nearly 80-mile stretch of the river, with a biomass of 705 metric tons.

“In the Great Lakes, we already know that native fish are adapting to non-prey items like quagga mussels and round gobies,” MSUE continued. “We also know that predation has not been enough to eliminate these species or prevent their negative effects. The same is likely true for Asian carp.”

(This article appeared originally in B.A.S.S. Times.) 

Monday
Mar232015

Industry Looks at Boat Design as a Way to Combat Mussel Invasion

Zebra mussels on shopping cart

For years, resource managers focused on education, regulations, and boat inspections to help stop the spread of invasive species such a zebra mussels. But in late January, a new tactic was initiated as a first-of-its-kind boat design summit was staged here.

“If you can build a better boat, it makes it easier down the line,” said Brian Goodwin of the American Boat and Yacht Council (ABYC), which develops safety standards and is a sponsor. “There is no silver bullet that will solve the problem. But this is part of it.”

Other sponsors included the National Marine Manufacturers Association, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the state of Minnesota and Lake Minnetonka’s Tonka Bay Marina. Minnesota ranks No. 1 nationally in boat ownership per capita.

Organizers hoped that the event would stimulate recommendations for new designs for the more than 100 boat manufacturers, marina operators, conservation leaders, and biologists in attendance.

“This is a critical piece we need to look at and make sure we’re doing all we can do to reduce the risk,” said Ann Pierce of the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. “I think it will be extremely beneficial, and not just for Minnesota.”

In addition to attaching themselves to hulls, mussels often stow away on boats in any place that water accumulates, including motors, bilges, livewells, and transom wells. Pontoon boats, the fastest growing sector of the boating industry, and wakeboard boats, which collect water to create wakes, especially are conductive for aquatic hitchhiking. For example, lifting strakes on pontoons enable them to go faster, but they often are sealed only at one end, allowing small mussels entry at the other.

“For a lot of companies, it’s going to be a retooling,” said Bob Menne, owner of Premier Marine, the fourth-largest pontoon manufacturer in the nation, and the only one, he said, to weld strakes and keels to keep out zebra mussels.

“We take it as a very serious issue,” he said.

Tuesday
Mar172015

Troublesome Invasive Plant Returns to Potomac River

Sassafras River Association volunteers collected these water chestnuts from creeks and streams on Maryland’s Eastern Shore

A troublesome old invasive has reared its head once again on the Potomac River. While sampling fish populations, biologists with Virginia Game and Inland Fisheries (VGIF) found a dense clump of water chestnuts, covering about ½ acre of water, near a boat rental dock in Pohick Bay Regional Park, 25 miles south of the nation’s capital.

Response was quick, as VGIF organized volunteers to hand pull the troublesome plant this past fall.

Water chestnut is probably a lot more troublesome and invasive potentially than snakeheads might be,” said biologist John Odenkirk.

“It was dense, but we got it. Hopefully, we nipped the potential for this plant to take over the bay and shut it down.”

Because it is an annual that sprouts from seeds, this fast-growing exotic is not susceptible to herbicides. It can be controlled only by pulling or mechanical harvest. The seeds have sharp needles that can attach to wildlife, clothing, and other items for transport to new areas, and they can remain viable in sediment for more than a decade. Just one acre of plants can yield enough seeds to cover 100 acres.

Native to both Asia and Europe, water chestnut was first confirmed on the Potomac in 1923, with a two-acre bed expanding to cover 41 miles of river, from Washington, D.C., to near Quantico, Va., in just two years. According to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the dense, floating mats restricted navigation, harmed fisheries, and killed off submersed plants with their thick canopy.

The Army Corps of Engineers mechanically harvested the infestation and the plant was considered mostly eradicated from the Potomac by 1945. But limited hand harvesting continued into the 1960s.

USGS is studying this more recent invader to determine its species and lineage. Its spiny seed pods don’t resemble those of water chestnuts found in Maryland and other states. Additionally, VGIF and volunteer stewards will keep an eye out for future outbreaks.