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Entries in Louisiana (30)


Gulf Red Snapper Fishing at Stake in Pending Lawsuit

There’s a lawsuit pending in the U.S. District Court in New Orleans that every recreational angler ought to be following like a hawk.
The case will decide whether public wildlife resources that rightly belong to all of us will instead be funneled into fewer and fewer hands -- and whether federal waters can be effectively walled off to private recreational anglers for the advantage of a tiny group of politically influential special interests.
NOAA Fisheries calls it “Amendment 40,” but it ought to be known as “Privatization 70,” because that’s what it does: if this scheme is allowed to stand, commercial fishing and charter boats will be handed a monopoly over more than 70 percent of the Gulf red snapper fishery, while recreational anglers are forced to watch from the docks.
Dysfunctional federal management has already resulted in a 10-day red snapper season these last two summers, down from 44 days the year before.
But it’s not just recreational anglers who are being short-changed.  More than 16,000 Americans owe their jobs to bait and tackle shops alone -- and that’s not even counting the big-box stores and chain retailers.  Altogether, the independent bait shops alone generate more than $796 million annually in payroll.
A red snapper season of just one weekend a year wreaks havoc on the Gulf economy, as everything from gas stations and motels to restaurants and tackle shops feels the impact. Unfortunately, nobody from NOAA took the time to evaluate the economic aftershocks.

What’s behind Amendment 40?  A lot of clever lawyering by the Environmental Defense Fund and their shill operations in the Gulf.  The unholy alliance: 387 commercial fishing operators; a handful of charter/for-hire operators, and a bunch of professional environmental lobbyists in Washington, D.C.  Coastal Conservation Association highlights the united front standing against us.
The white hats are fighting Amendment 40 in the U.S. District Court, and the State of Louisiana has recently weighed in with its support, filing an amicus brief in support of our position. 
A lot is at stake.  Stay tuned.  

From the Coastal Conservation Association 


Citizens Must Be Voice for Fish and Wildlife in Gulf Restoration

Less than five years after the largest marine oil spill in U.S. history, BP has agreed to pay $18.7 billion in penalties and damages for its role. This stands in stark contrast to the decades-long litigation following the Exxon Valdez spill, and is great news not only for those who live along the Gulf Mexico, but for all of us who recognize the ecological, recreational, and economic value of this region to the nation.

Much of our seafood comes from there. Millions of us visit the five Gulf states annually to fish and enjoy other outdoor pursuits. And if you live in the Midwest or Great Plains, the waterfowl hunting that you enjoy annually is  dependent on healthy and abundant marshes and wetlands along the Gulf Coast, where 70 percent of waterfowl from the Central and Mississippi Flyways stopover or winter annually.

Now that we have an amount for what it likely the largest environmental settlement in history, it's important that plans and projects be implemented wisely and effectively. The federal RESTORE Act of 2012 will ensure that 80 percent of any Clean Water Act civil and administrative penalties paid by BP and other companies responsible for the disaster goes to the Gulf Coast Restoration Fund. That means each of the Gulf states will receive hundreds of millions of dollars to implement recovery plans, starting with Pot 1 for wildlife habitat restoration and improvement of water quality. This category also provides for “job creation” and “infrastructure projects,” which could allow expenditures that sound good but that won’t help the Gulf.

That's why it will be important for citizens along the Gulf to be a voice for fish and wildlife. They must tell their governors and state legislators that they want the money spent on projects such as restoring wetlands, sea grasses, and barrier islands, as well as ensuring adequate freshwater flows, which are important for sustaining healthy spawning and nursery habitat for fish and wintering areas for ducks and geese.

Vanishing Paradise looks forward to working with federal and state officials and the RESTORE Council to make sure that the BP funds go to meaningful, comprehensive restoration.

And as this work begins, we should remember that we still don't know the true extent of the damage caused by an estimated 4.9 million gallons of oil pouring onto the ocean floor. Years and possibly even decades will be required to determine population level impacts to species.

What we do know is that an estimated one million birds died from exposure to the oil, as well as large numbers of dolphins and sea turtles. We also know that cleanup crews removed 106,465 tons of "oily material" from Gulf shorelines by the end of 2013. And BP reports that it already had spent $14 billion and 70 million personnel hours on cleanup and response by that time.

With direction as provided by the RESTORE Act and watchful oversight from those of us who want the best for Gulf Coast fish and wildlife, it now will spend an additional $18.7 billion.


BP to Pay $18.7 Billion for Gulf Oil Spill

BP will pay $18.7 billion in penalties and damages for its role in the largest oil spill in U.S. history, which polluted the Gulf of Mexico five years ago.

“Today‘s settlement moves the wildlife and habitat of the Gulf Coast forward on the road to recovery. It’s time to look ahead to the future and work toward getting real, on-the-ground restoration projects done," said Steve Bender, director of Vanishing Paradise, a coalition of more than 800 sportsman and outdoors groups, organizations and businesses working on Gulf Coast and Mississippi river Delta restoration.

“Because Congress passed the RESTORE Act in 2012, 80 percent of the money BP pays as a result of the Clean Water Act penalty will be returned to the Gulf Coast for much needed restoration and to improve the region’s long-term resiliency. Repairing the ongoing damage from the oil spill is also of utmost importance going forward, and the settlement dollars BP pays through the Natural Resource Damage Assessment will help the areas devastated by the spill – including habitat that supports world-class hunting and fishing."

The Gulf Coast region is an ecological and economic driver for the entire nation, and sportsmen and women care about ensuring this national treasure is restored for future generations to enjoy. With as many as 14 million waterfowl migrating to the Gulf’s warm shores annually, and salt and freshwater fishing unlike anywhere else on the planet, we must make sure this entire region – including the endangered Mississippi River Delta – is on the path forward to long-term health and recovery. We look forward to working with federal and state officials and the RESTORE Council to make sure every dime of oil disaster money goes to meaningful, comprehensive restoration.”


Since the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, ongoing findings deliver truths omitted by BP’s ads: the oil disaster’s negative effects are increasingly clear, present and far from resolved.

A recent infographic depicts ongoing impacts of the Gulf oil disaster five years later. And over the past year alone, new scientific research has surfaced:

A 2014 study found evidence of a 1,250-square-mile area of oil contamination on the ocean floor around the Macondo wellhead in deep Gulf sediments.

A previous NOAA study found a large number of dead dolphins in heavily oiled places, including Barataria Bay, La.

Recent studies estimate 1,000,000 birds died as a result of being exposed to BP oil.

Modeling for a recent stock assessment projected that between 20,000 and 60,000 Kemp’s ridley sea turtles died in 2010 as a result of the spill.

A 2014 study found concentrations of PAH (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) – which can cause harmful effects in many birds, fish and wildlife – in Barataria and Terrebonne marshes, which may persist for decades.

A 2012 study found that oiled marshes in Barataria Bay eroded at double the rate of non-oiled marshes.

A recent survey found that 70 percent of Americans believe BP should pay maximum fines under the Clean Water Act for its role in the 2010 Gulf oil spill.

VP has identified 19 projects from Louisiana’s Comprehensive Master Plan for a Sustainable Coast that have the greatest potential to restore our coast. 


Vanishing Paradise Champions Gulf Coast Restoration

The Gulf Coast was imperiled even before the Deepwater Horizon oil spill of 2010.  

That’s because erosion and saltwater intrusion are destroying wetlands and marshes in the Mississippi River Delta and have been for decades, mostly because of manmade alterations and degradations. In 2009, that realization prompted the National Wildlife Federation and Ducks Unlimited to unite to awaken Congress and the nation to the crisis through the Vanishing Paradise (VP) coalition.

As a result of that serendipitous timing, fish, waterfowl, sportsmen, and coastal communities have a champion in their corner today as BP pays billions for damage inflicted upon the Gulf. With more than 800 fishing and hunting businesses and organizations supporting its mission, VP wants that money used to restore and enhance those wetlands and marshes, as well as mitigate the environmental damage done by the oil spill all along the coast.

“We engaged heavily to get anglers and hunters to Washington, D.C. to talk to their legislators and help pass important legislation,” said Steve Bender, VP director. “And it worked. We delivered the RESTORE Act.”

A volunteer Advisory Council and Conservation Pro Staff deserve much of the credit not only for passage of the act but for promoting the campaign and educating the public about the coastal crisis, he added.

The 2011 RESTORE the Gulf Coast Act allocates a portion of the funds equally to the five Gulf Coast states for ecological and economic recovery, and establishes the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council to develop and fund a plan for recovery. It also establishes an endowment that includes funding for fisheries stock assessments and ecosystem monitoring.

“Since then, we’ve been focusing on restoration,” Bender continued. “We’ve been asked to expand our scope (from the Delta) into the Gulf.

“Louisiana already had a master plan. And now that other states are receiving dollars, we are working on getting that money spent on coastal recovery and economic restoration. We have policy specialists in those states, and we’re going to expand angler and hunter outreach.”

Ground Zero for protection and restoration work, however, remains the Delta at the mouth of the Mississippi River on Louisiana’s coast. This vast wetlands area is critical as spawning and nursery grounds for fish and overwintering habitat for much of the nation’s waterfowl. And since the 1930s, an estimated 1,880 square miles of habitat has been lost.

“Given the importance of so many of south Louisiana’s natural assets --- its waterways, natural resources, and unique culture, and wetlands --- this land loss crisis is nothing short of a national emergency, one that takes a daily toll on the lives of coastal residents,” said the state Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority, which developed the 2012 Coastal Master Plan.

In Louisiana, what it all boils down to is trying to stop the destruction and implement a system that mimics, as much as possible,  the natural process interrupted by development --- a system that will restore wetlands and marshes for fish and wildlife, while providing protection for coastal communities from saltwater intrusion.

Why is this needed? The reasons are many, according to VP, but one of the most significant is that the Mississippi River “has been straitjacketed with huge levees as part of a national program to ‘control’ the river and protect communities and economic infrastructure from flooding.”

But wetlands were built and sustained by sediment delivered by the river, and cutting them off with levees stopped new growth, allowing for saltwater intrusion that kills them.

“Without land-building deposits from the river, the Delta is doomed to continue sinking beneath the water, endangering the people, wildlife, and jobs that depend on these healthy resources,” VP said.

According to the master plan, restoration and protection projects will focus on sediment diversion, marsh creation, bank stabilization, structural and shoreline protection, and hydrologic, barrier island, and ridge restoration. Unfortunately,  proposed diversions have generated opposition from some, who otherwise support the plan. That’s because sediment-carrying sediment, which will rebuild marshes, also will move saltwater species back toward the Gulf.

It’s easy to understand their point of view: They don’t want to surrender any of their fishing grounds, including those created by man’s interference with a natural system. But such a view is short-sighted, since the continued health of both freshwater and saltwater fisheries is dependent on freshwater and sediment. If saltwater continues to encroach, nearly all nursery habitat will be lost and redfish and trout will decline, along with bass and catfish.

“The problem in Louisiana is we’re addicted to salt because that salt brings tremendous benefits in fisheries,” explained Robert Twilley, a coastal scientist at Louisiana State University.

Every year, he cautioned, that artificial fishery moves closer to the river than nature ever intended.

Along the Mississippi at Buras, a stark contrast highlights the importance of using freshwater diversions, explained Ryan Lambert, a VP supporter and owner of Cajun Fishing Adventures. On the west side, which receives little to no freshwater, only open water and dead marsh grass remains. On the east side, where freshwater flows, the wetlands are alive and thriving.

In that area, he added, “bass fishermen and redfish fishermen go to the same place to catch fish. From Buras down to the mouth of the Mississippi is the best fishing in North America.

“You can’t just pump in sediment,” he said. “You have to have freshwater too (for sustained fisheries).”

Lambert pointed out that the Davis Pond Diversion, where Kevin VanDam won the 2011 Bassmaster Classic, is no longer a viable fishery because diversion flow has been reduced. “Saltwater has come in and killed the grass,” he said. “There are no bass, no brim, no crappie, no catfish, and no duck habitat. And it’s all because they want to grow oysters there.”

As work goes forward, Bender emphasized that the master plan is not just about diversion and VP wants to work with all stakeholders, including those who oppose that aspect. “We want to limit the impacts on folks who might be hurt,” he said. “We need to find a way to work together.

“But we also feel strongly that you have to let the river do what it does naturally.

“Gov. (Bobby) Jindal has been very supportive of restoration, and we’re hoping that the new governor coming in will be the same,” Bender said. “We have more partnerships on the horizon and a new campaign coming up in Louisiana soon.”

(This article appeared originally in Fishing Tackle Retailer.)


More Anglers Choosing Kayaks; Here's Why

New Jersey kayak angler Richie Moschella

Unless you are one of a small but growing number who fish from a kayak, chances are that what you think you know about the little craft is wrong.

You think that they are too unstable? Not anymore. Now you can stand up to fish.

You think that they are too uncomfortable? Not anymore. How does a swivel seat sound?

Want electronics? You can have that too.

And, hey, you don’t even have to paddle if you don’t want to. Some fishing kayaks now have pedal drive systems. That means you can move backward as well as forward, with both arms free, and cast as you go.

“Ten years ago, you had to fish out of a touring kayak,” said Richie Moschella, a longtime B.A.S.S. member, kayak fishing veteran, and host of the Reel Deal Fishing Show out of New Jersey.

“But, in the last two years, kayak fishing has just exploded. Today, some (fishing industry) companies are even starting kayak fishing pro staffs.”

Statistics from the Outdoor Industry Association reflect that “explosion.” In 2009, kayak fishing participation wasn’t even surveyed. Today, nearly 1.8 million anglers say that they fish from these lightweight, easily portable craft.

 For fishermen, at least, those first-generation kayaks were unstable and uncomfortable, and they were not suited for adding options. Rather than providing the means to better enjoy another outdoor activity such as fishing, they were intended solely for what their name implies--- touring. Just casting from one of those could be perilous because of their tendency to tip with the slightest shift in weight.

“I never liked canoes after tipping one,” said T. Chad Montgomery, a Georgia angler. “When I found Freedom Hawk, I could stand, which is how I prefer to fish, and the stability gave me peace of mind. I was hooked immediately for something I said I’d never be into.”

The Freedom Hawk provides a perfect example of how touring kayaks have evolved into man-powered fishing machines. It features an outrigger system that can be extended into a Y shape for stand-up fishing. It also offers a casting brace to lean against.

Down in Louisiana, meanwhile, Russ Pylant now fishes from a top-of-the-line Hobie Pro Angler 14, a pedal-powered craft with lots of bells and whistles that retails for about $3,000. And at 6-5 and 260 pounds, he can stand and fish comfortably in it.

“You give up some speed and maneuverability for stability and standing capacity,” he explained.

But Pylant began with a more modest vessel. 

“I started out with a Bass Pro Ascend (about $500),” he said. “It only took me a few months to see this hobby was going to stick and I upgraded to a Wilderness Systems Tarpon 140 (about $1,200).

Moschella, who gives seminars on kayak fishing, added that an angler should pay at least $500 for his first kayak, while a “decent kayak setup” likely will run $700 to $1,200.

“I know so many who buy cheap,” he said. “I tell people that what they pay is the experience that they will have.”

The New Jersey angler explained that he experienced some of that when he started kayak fishing in 2007. “Some of them were cheap and bad,” he said. “They took on water. They sat too low. They didn’t move true in the water. Yeah, they might weigh less, but you get what you pay for.”

His choice today is a Native Watercraft, 12-foot, sit-on-top that weighs about 75 pounds and retails for about $1,200. “It’s so comfortable that it’s almost like sitting in a chair. Nine hours seems like nothing,” he said. “Native Watercraft really thought about fishermen when it made this kayak.

Russ Pylant. Photo by Casey Brunning of FiN Crazy. Click photo for more information.

One of the most important steps in the evolution from touring to fishing has been development of the sit-on-top kayak. Typically, sit-in varieties are more difficult to get into and launch and are more prone to tipping. Additionally, angler movement is more restricted.

Besides allowing the fisherman to stand in some models, the sit-on-top also offers better leverage for a hookset, even when the angler is seated. Still, it’s a good idea to exercise caution, even in kayaks designed for fishing. Before moving into deep water for the first time, practice casting and reaching around you in the shallows to gauge your stability. In general, you’ll want to use your arms more and cast with a little more finesse than you would from shore or in a bass boat.

“If the water favors it, many kayak anglers side straddle their kayaks, meaning they sit side ways while their legs dangle in the water,” said Austin Kayaks. “Keeps you cool but also provides a general feeling of balance and many find it a bit more comfortable of a position, especially if paddling and fishing for long periods of time. A general rule of thumb is to always keep your body upright and your head centered over your kayak.”

Another advantage of the sit-on-top are the scupper holes, which make the vessel self-baling.

Aside from a drainage system and a comfortable seat, what else should an angler have to start kayak fishing? A paddle and a personal flotation devices are basics. Also, he probably will want rod holders and a storage system. Other options include a rudder, anchor, electronics, and safety light for after-dark fishing. Pylant keeps a floating net and measuring board for tournaments.

“The possibilities are endless,” Moschella said. “You can have video/GoPro (camera) holders too. You can just keep building on.

“You can find bundle packages too,” he added. “Some of the kayak fishing stores will install things for you, and the online stores might too. Most of them are owned by people who love the sport and want to pass it on.”

What’s to love about kayak fishing? That’s easy, according to Moschella, Montgomery, Plant, and many others: It’s much less expensive than the bass boat option, with virtually no cost for fuel or upkeep, and it allows you into places that larger and/or motorized craft can’t access. Also, kayaks are easy to transport, either on top of a car, in the bed of a truck, or with a lightweight C-Tug cart that can be dismantled and stowed in the vessel.

“I can’t think of a better way to fish,” Moschella said. ‘You can get into that pad field that a bass boat can’t get into. You can paddle right up to a (fallen) tree and see the submerged branches. You can use map services to find ponds that only you can get into. It’s like fishing unpressured, private waters.”

 Kayak Tournament Fishing

 Many like kayaks for fishing because of the serenity aspect, exploring remote backwaters with no outboard to scare the fish or disturb the peace. But as fishing kayaks evolve, so do how they are used. Those who can’t afford bass boats and don’t want to fish out of the back now have another option.

“Tournaments are really spiking,” Moschella said. “You see them mostly in salt right now, but they’re becoming more popular in fresh.

“In New Jersey, we’re seeing it in small tournaments. You take photos and measurements. It’s the honor system.”

He hopes that aspect will expand. “I’d like to see a pro tour, maybe with B.A.S.S. involved,” he said. “But we’re not at that point yet.”

Heroes on the Water

Fishing from kayaks also has a therapeutic quality, according to this organization, which arranges trips for veterans.

“What looks like a day trip of paddling and fishing is, in fact, something much deeper and long-lasting,” it says on its website. “Our unique kayak fishing program allows the participants a chance to decompress from the stresses associated with combat and the physical rigors of rehabilitation. Warriors enjoy these benefits while on guided fishing trips held in local communities around the country.”

One soldier called the outings “triple therapy,” since they provide physical by paddling and fishing, occupational through learning a lifetime sport/activity, and mental by relaxing in nature with no distractions or expectations of performance.

Kayak Fishing Statistics

1.8 million people participated in kayak fishing in 2013 for a three-year growth rate of 20 percent.

1 in 38 kayak anglers are female.

1 in 5 kayak anglers cast their lines in Florida.

(Source: Outdoor Industry Association’s Outdoor Recreation Participation Report 2014, and 2013 Survey)

(This article appeared originally in B.A.S.S. Times.)