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Entries in Michigan (35)


Century-Old Smallmouth Record Broken in Michigan

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources has just confirmed a new state-record smallmouth bass, breaking a standard that was more than a century old.

Greg Gasiciel of Rhodes, Michigan. caught the huge bronzeback while casting  a green grub at Hubbard Lake in Alcona County.

The record of 9.33 pounds was verified by Kathrin Schrouder, a DNR fisheries biologist in Bay City. The fish was 24.5 inches long.

“This is additional evidence that Michigan truly has world-class bass fisheries,” said Jim Dexter, Department of Natural Resources Fisheries chief. "Smallmouth bass is one of the most popular, most sought-after sportfish in North America. Even though the Michigan state record stood for more than 100 years, we're excited to see the bar set even higher for those who set out to land this iconic fish."

The previous state record for smallmouth bass was set in 1906 with a 9.25-pound, 27.25-inch fish taken from Long Lake in Cheboygan County. Records show this fish was caught by W.F. Shoemaker.

State records are recognized by weight only. To qualify for a state record, fish must exceed the current listed state-record weight and identification must be verified by a DNR fisheries biologist.



Michigan Considers Opening Some Waters to Bass Tournaments During Spawn

With catch and release now allowed year around in most state waters, Michigan is considering opening 16 of its fisheries in the lower peninsula to bass tournaments during the spawn.

That means catch-and-delayed-release (CDR) would be permitted for registered tournaments from the last Saturday in April through the Saturday before Memorial Day.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources played host to public meetings about this and other proposed regulation changes during July. In addition, spokesman Nick Popoff said, "We will take input electronically as well for four or five months."

The proposed CDR fisheries would include Lake Charlevoix, Houghton Lake, Burt Lake, Mullett Lake, Hardy Dam Pond, White Lake, Muskegon Lake, Gull Lake, Gun Lake, Kent Lake, Portage Chain, Cass Lake, Half Moon Chain, Pontiac Lake, Wixom Lake, and Holloway Reservoir.

DNR said, "There is a limited biological uncertainty with liberalizing bass seasons. But, it added, "Most U.S. states allow bass fishing during the spawn without negative population impacts. Limiting the lakes will allow the DNR and public to gauge biological and social implications."

The agency also pointed out that local communities "could see economic boosts with more tournament activity."

Michigan had been considering allowing catch and release during the spawn for years, before initiating it this past April. The Michigan B.A.S.S. Nation was at the forefront of a campaign to make it happen.

 "Throughout that time, we had six test lakes, and did a lot of research to determine does CIR (catch-and-immediate-release) negatively affect spawning bass, versus CDR," Popoff said. "All of our research has shown there is no negative impact on spawning bass populations to target and catch those fish and immediately return them to the water." 


Michigan DNR Sets Up Online System for Bass Tournaments

Organizers for bass tournaments in Michigan now can use an online system to schedule their events at state-managed access sites and to report catch results.

According to the Department of Natural Resources (DNR), the Michigan Fishing Tournament Information System will help minimize scheduling conflicts, as directors can view dates for other competitions on specific waterbodies.

In addition to alleviating scheduling concerns, this application will make it easier for directors to share catch data with DNR.

“Fisheries Division encourages bass tournament directors to enter their scheduled tournaments into this system as well as voluntarily contribute their tournament catch results to help us manage Michigan’s bass fisheries,” the agency said.

“The scientific value of tournament catch and effort data will be greater if more tournament directors participate in reporting their bass tournament results. This information will be used by state fisheries biologists, in combination with data from other sources, as a basis for informed fisheries management decisions.”

While organizers must set up an account to schedule events, the general public will be free to check tournament calendars at their favorite access sites.

But the public won’t be able to view catch results, nor will organizers be able to view data other than their own.


Mussels Could Be Contributing to Toxic Algae Blooms

Proposed reductions in phosphorous runoff from agricultural lands might not be enough to counter Lake Erie’s increasing susceptibility to toxic algae blooms, according to University of Michigan researchers.

"Our results suggest that current phosphorus loading targets will be insufficient for reducing the intensity of cyanobacteria blooms to desired levels, so long as the lake remains in a heightened state of bloom susceptibility," said lead author Daniel Obenour of the university’s Water Center.

That “heightened state” led to nearly half a million Ohio and Michigan residents being deprived of drinking water for several days in early August because of a cyanobacteria bloom containing the toxin microsystin.

The problem seems to be that the blooms are becoming more sensitive to phosphorus, according to the scientists.

But what has caused this and the corresponding increase in size of cyanobacteria blooms since the mid 1990s? That’s not so easy to explain.

Computer modeling revealed that a special form of phosphorus, DRP (dissolved reactive phosphorus) is more readily absorbed by algae, but it did not explain increased bloom susceptibility. Also, late-summer surface water temperatures did not increase enough to exacerbate the problem.

Exotic quagga and zebra mussels, however, could be a factor. The filter-feeding shellfish gorge on many species of phytoplankton, but avoid those that produce toxins. In other words, the latter now have less competition for nutrients, including phosphorus.

"We tested to see if the increase in the DRP fraction could be the cause, and it did not pass the test. It also does not look like water temperature is driving the increased susceptibility,” said Don Scavia, co-author and aquatic ecologist. “We're thinking it may have been the increase in mussels.

"As long as the lake remains in this heightened state of susceptibility, this problem is likely to persist,” he added. “That means we need to better understand what is driving the increased susceptibility and whether it can be controlled, or if deeper phosphorus reductions are needed.”


Michigan to Start Online Scheduling for Bass Tournaments

Photo by Ron Kinnunen

Beginning Jan. 1, if you want to schedule a bass tournament at a state-managed access site in Michigan, you can do so online. The Michigan Tournament Fishing Information System web application is intended to reduce scheduling conflicts. But it also could improve management of the state’s bass fisheries if organizers will use it to report catch data.

Here’s more from Michigan DNR:

"This system is designed to help both tournament organizers and recreational anglers and boaters avoid ramp conflicts. In addition, tournament organizers can electronically report their catch data and help Fisheries Division effectively manage our valuable fisheries resources.

"By policy, Fisheries Division will not assist nor become involved in promoting fishing tournaments. However, Fisheries Division recognizes that bass tournament catch and effort data can provide important information about bass populations across the state of Michigan."