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Entries in Pippa (3)

Sunday
Jun112017

Activist Angler Writes Book About Dogs

Local fishing expert and award-winning writer Robert Montgomery’s fourth book in less than five years has recently been released.

Unlike his previous books, however, which are mainly about nature, conservation, fishing and the appreciation of nature, “Pippa's Journey: Tail-Wagging Tales of Rescue Dogs” is about dogs, specifically adopted dogs, and highlights the efforts of Farmington Pet Adoption Center (FPAC) and other no-kill shelters.

Pippa’s Journey describes the “often funny, near tragic, and always exciting ride” Montgomery took with his dog during their first four years together. He dedicated the book “to man’s best friend and no-kill animal shelters,” and is donating a portion of the profit from the sale of each book to the Farmington Pet Adoption Center, where he found Pippa in 2013.

Read rest of article in Daily Journal.

Wednesday
May032017

New Book About Man's Best Friend From Activist Angler

 

"This book is dedicated to man’s best friend and no-kill animal shelters. A portion of the profit from the sale of each book will be donated to the Farmington Pet Adoption Center (M0), where I found Pippa in 2013."

In addition to inspirational stories about Pippa and other rescue dogs, the book contains two appendix articles about the different kinds of shelters and how they work and why people should adopt from shelters, especially adult dogs.

Book is available at Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

Wednesday
Mar062013

Black Is Beautiful

Photo by Robert Montgomery

I’m veering off topic today, something that I do occasionally. But I believe that this is a subject of interest to many fishermen.

That’s because they are dog owners/lovers, as am I.

Following the death of Ursa, my companion for nearly 14 years, I went to the animal shelter last Wednesday to adopt another dog. I went with the intention of getting a pup or at least an animal no older than 6 months.

But once you’ve had a companion dog, walk into a shelter (this one is “no-kill”), and see all those loving animals behind bars, it changes the way you see things, and, as a result, your priorities.

I chose Pippa. She’s an affectionate but somewhat shy, mixed breed, and she was the only one not barking incessantly for attention --- “Pick me! Pick me! Pick me!”

The shelter described her as a “Lab mix.”  I think that she is part greyhound and/or collie as well. She’s 1 ½ years old and she had been at the shelter all of her life. All of her siblings were adopted as pups. And here’s the key part: She is black.

Why is that key?

After I finished with the adoption paperwork, a volunteer told me that shelters have difficulty finding homes for black dogs. That stunned me. Such a thing never occurred to me.

Then four more people --- unsolicited --- told me the same thing. And a friend sent me a link to this website.

What I’m asking here is that you consider adopting from a shelter the next time that you want to get a dog and, please, take a look at the black dogs.

Photo by Robert Montgomery

In just a few days, Pippa has transformed into an absolutely incredible companion, and I’ve had the pleasure of watching her discover so much about life that she never had experienced.

Three days after I brought her home, I felt confident enough to allow her off the leash. In short order she discovered running and jumping. Two days later, we had snow, and she reveled in that. Now she’s learned that the world is full of interesting scents and she wants to savor them all.

But still she is obedient. She already knows “come,” “sit,” “stay,” and “bed.” In less than 10 seconds, I taught her to climb a long flight of steps.

The only negative? Black absorbs light and so black dogs don’t photograph as well. I’ll take that tradeoff anytime.

Please, think about adopting your next dog. And take a look at what most others are rejecting when you do.