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Entries in public access (43)

Monday
Jun092014

Missouri Opposes Federal Plan to Restrict River Access

Photo by Robert Montgomery

Sometime this summer, a new management plan will be rolled out for two of the Ozarks’ prime smallmouth streams, the Jacks Fork and the Current Rivers. They are part of the Ozarks National Scenic Riverways (ONSR) managed by the National Park Service (NPS).

The NPS’s preferred alternative of four options is “B,” which includes access restrictions. Among them would be a ban on motorboats for the upper portions of the rivers.

Rowdy behavior, illegal camping, and unauthorized trails, especially in recent years, contributed to consideration of reduced access.

But the proposal has been vigorously opposed by many in Missouri, including state politicians, especially after the NPS tried --- and failed --- to have the White River watershed declared a federal “Blueway.”

“The rivers zone themselves. There isn’t enough river flow in the upper reaches of the Jacks Fork and Current for big boats to get there,” said Jack Peters of Running River Canoe Rental. “From what I’ve seen, there is no conflict there.”

In a letter to the NPS, 23 state senators said the following:

“We support the ‘no-action alternative’ to the current operating system. The ONSR value to the region is unparalleled. Do not adopt a GMP (general management plan) that is contrary to our wishes, those of our constituents, and the other folks who depend on access to the Riverways and cannot operate with additional government regulations.

“In our opinion, the ONSR is already over-managed with burdensome federal regulations. The Riverways support a vibrant and growing tourism industry that is critical to our region and state.”

Additionally, some even called for the state to take over management.

 “The creation and management of parks is clearly a responsibility that Missouri handles well. There is no reason to believe it would be any different with a state-managed Ozark Scenic Riverways. It's time for Missouri to begin efforts to reclaim this resource from the federal government,” said Lieutenant Gov. Peter Kinder.

Monday
Apr212014

'Ecosystem Management' Is Tactic to Restrict Fishing

Passed in 1973, the federal Endangered Species Act (ESA) was much needed. Before then, we have given little regard to the damage that we were doing to fish and wildlife through pollution, habitat destruction, and overharvest. The gray wolf, the shortnose sturgeon, the whooping crane, and the American crocodile are but a few of the species brought back from the brink.

But soon environmental activists discovered that they could use the act to impose preservationist agendas, under the guise of saving endangered species. They started suing the federal government to force action.

As a result, the ESA now has become a polarizing force, as examples abound of the federal government abusing its power to seize and/or deny use of privately owned lands and waters. Sadly, some property owners even practice “shoot, shovel, and shut up” as a means of protecting themselves.

And now the environmentalists, financed by Pew Charitable Trusts, want to use the same tactic to restrict fishing by imposing “ecosystem-based fisheries management.” It’s simply the ESA by another name, with the focus on our waters.

The Recreational Fishing Alliance reports this Pew strategy:

“Ecosystem-based fisheries management could ensure the long-term health of our fisheries and the communities that depend on them for recreation, employment, and nutrition," with environmental advocates describing the vague term as a system to "account for the protection of important habitats, consider the critical role of prey, or forage fish, in the food web, and reduce the waste of non-target species through bycatch."

And in response, Jim Donofrio, executive director of the Recreational Fishing Alliance, says this:

"Pew Charitable Trusts wants ecosystem protections put into the federal fisheries law. That way they've got a legal argument to sue and settle for increased fisheries restrictions.

"Under such a nebulous ecosystem definition, Pew and their partners would then have a legal challenge to close down any recreational fishery they choose by claiming the need to protect sea lice, spearing, oyster toads, undersea corals, even jellyfish."

In May, Pew will hold a forum for Connecticut anglers in what RFA calls the “Hijacking America” tour.

“The Pew script explains how ecosystem plans should be created and implemented across our coasts to further integrate ecosystem considerations into management, while appealing for support for incorporating ecosystem-based fishery management policies into federal law by way of changes to MSA (Magnuson-Stevens Act). Event organizers are hyping ecosystem-based management as yet another ‘new approach’ to fisheries management in their war on recreational fishing,” RFA says.

Go here to learn more about this and how Pew, according to RFA, is trying to recruit recreational anglers “willing only to speak positively about federal fisheries management policies that have denied anglers access to healthy, rebuilt stocks like summer flounder, black sea bass, and porgy.”

Wednesday
Mar122014

Many Oppose NPS Plan to Restrict Ozarks Access

Photo by Robert Montgomery

Sometime this summer, a new  management plan will be rolled out for two of the Ozarks’ prime smallmouth streams, the Jacks Fork and the Current Rivers. They are part of the Ozarks National Scenic Riverways (ONSR) managed by the National Park Service (NPS).

The NPS’s preferred alternative of four options is “B,” which includes access restrictions. Among them would be a ban on motorboats for the upper portions of the rivers.

Rowdy behavior, illegal camping, and unauthorized trails, especially in recent years, contributed to consideration of reduced access.

But the proposal has been vigorously opposed by many in Missouri, including state politicians, especially after the NPS tried --- and failed --- to have the White River watershed declared a federal “Blueway.”

“The rivers zone themselves. There isn’t enough river flow in the upper reaches of the Jacks Fork and Current for big boats to get there,” said Jack Peters of Running River Canoe Rental. “From what I’ve seen, there is no conflict there.”

In a letter to the NPS, 23 state senators said the following:

“We support the ‘no-action alternative’ to the current operating system. The ONSR value to the region is unparalleled. Do not adopt a GMP (general management plan) that is contrary to our wishes, those of our constituents, and the other folks who depend on access to the Riverways and cannot operate with additional government regulations.

“In our opinion, the ONSR is already over-managed with burdensome federal regulations. The Riverways support a vibrant and growing tourism industry that is critical to our region and state.”

Additionally, some even called for the state to take over management.

 “The creation and management of parks is clearly a responsibility that Missouri handles well. There is no reason to believe it would be any different with a state-managed Ozark Scenic Riverways. It's time for Missouri to begin efforts to reclaim this resource from the federal government,” said Lieutenant Gov. Peter Kinder.

Tuesday
Feb112014

Speak Up Now to Keep Biscayne's Waters Open for Fishing 

After several years of facing the threat of a large-scale no-fishing zone in Florida's Biscayne National Park, anglers saw a major step in the right direction last November when a new proposed management plan was released that no longer includes the unwarranted, and overly-restrictive, marine reserve.

Now your help is needed to ensure that the marine reserve stays off the table, and that the new plan allows for ample recreational fishing access and conserves the park’s fisheries resources.

The park’s new preferred plan eliminates the previously proposed marine reserve and instead proposes a special recreation zone along a portion of the park’s reef tract in which fishing would be allowed year round under a permit system. Recreational fishing and boating is still permitted in nearly all of the remainder of the park under existing state and federal regulations.

You have until Feb. 20 to provide comments to the National Park Service. Please take a moment to voice your support for maintaining anglers’ ability to enjoy the exceptional fishing opportunities at Biscayne National Park.

It’s important for all anglers to pay attention to and comment on the current proposed management plan at Biscayne National Park. Thanks to Keep America Fishing advocates like you weighing in, significant progress has been made on this issue. It’s critically important that anglers continue to make their voices heard and ensure that this process continues to move in an improved direction.

Some preservationist groups have already mounted a campaign for the National Park Service to go back on its progress and instead revert to a marine reserve – we need your help to ensure that doesn’t happen!

Thursday
Dec192013

Why We Fish on the Radio

 

Please check out the radio shows and podcasts listed at the right and below. I was interviewed about my new book, Why We Fish. Hosts and I also talked about how and where to catch fish, B.A.S.S., and conservation and access issues.

And if you want to order a copy of Why We Fish as a Christmas present for your favorite angler, you'd better do it soon!

The Outdoor Guys at ESPN Radio in Kansas City.

The Outdoor Scoreboard Podcast.

Fish Bait Radio Show.