My Facebook pages

Robert Montgomery

Why We Fish

Fish, Frogs, and Fireflies

Pippa's Canine Corner 

 

 

Loading..
Loading..
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
Loading..
Loading..
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
Loading..
Loading..
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
Loading..
Loading..
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
Get Updates! and Search
No RSS feeds have been linked to this section.

 

 

 

 

Entries in recreational fishing (87)

Tuesday
Jul112017

Modern Fish Act Introduced in Senate

The recreational fishing and boating community praised the Senate introduction of the “Modernizing Recreational Fisheries Management Act of 2017” (Modern Fish Act), which would improve public access to America’s federal waters, promote conservation of our natural marine resources and spur economic growth.

A companion bill, H.R. 2023, was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives on April 6.

“On behalf of America’s 11 million saltwater anglers, we thank Senators Roger Wicker (R-Miss.), Bill Nelson (D-Fla.), Roy Blunt (R-Mo.), Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii), John Kennedy (R-La.) and Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.),” said Jeff Angers, president of the Center for Sportfishing Policy.

“Recreational fishing is a tradition worth safeguarding through proper management policies and a critical component of the U.S. economy, with an annual economic contribution of $63+ billion. With a bipartisan bill introduced in both chambers, we are hopeful the Congress will ensure all Americans have fair and reasonable access to our nation’s marine resources by passing the Modern Fish Act.”

 For years, the recreational fishing community has been hindered by antiquated policies that restrict access to public waters, hurt the U.S. economy and detract from conservation goals. The Modern Fish Act addresses many of the challenges faced by recreational anglers, including allowing alternative management tools for recreational fishing, reexamining fisheries allocations, smartly rebuilding fish stocks and improving recreational data collection. The bill aims to benefit fishing access and conservation by incorporating modern management approaches, science and technology to guide decision-making.

"When passed, this landmark legislation will modernize the federal regulations governing access to the public’s natural resources by boaters and anglers,” said National Marine Manufacturers Association President Thom Dammrich.

“The Modern Fish Act will achieve many goals, the most important of which is getting more Americans outdoors and enjoying our wonderful natural treasures,” added Mike Nussman, president of the American Sportfishing Association.

“This bipartisan legislation includes key provisions that will adapt federal fisheries management to manage recreational fishing in a way that better achieves conservation and public access goals. Recreational fishing provides many economic, social and conservation benefits to the nation, and with this legislation, the federal fisheries management system will better realize those benefits.”
  
“The Modern Fish Act offers reasonable solutions to a management system designed primarily for commercial fisheries but which has failed to address the needs of millions of saltwater anglers,” said Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation President Jeff Crane. “The simple adjustments in this bipartisan bill would continue to ensure conservation of our nation’s saltwater fisheries, while finally establishing greatly needed parity for the recreational fishing community.”
 
“The Modern Fish Act would fix key issues in the law governing marine fisheries that keep recreational anglers from enjoying access to healthy fisheries,” said Jim Donofrio, executive director of the Recreational Fishing Alliance.
 
The coalition supporting the Modern Fish Act includes American Sportfishing Association, Center for Sportfishing Policy, Coastal Conservation Association, Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation, Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation, International Game Fish Association, National Marine Manufacturers Association, Recreational Fishing Alliance, The Billfish Foundation and Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership.

Thursday
Jun292017

Council Appointments Show Recreational Fishing, Boating Priorities for Trump Administration

Members of 2017 Regional Fishery Management Council confirm that recreational fishing and boating are important to the Trump Administration, according to advocacy groups.

“Today’s appointments to the Regional Fishery Management Council are exactly what the recreational fishing and boating community needed from the Trump Administration,” said Jeff Angers, president of the Center for Sportfishing Policy.

“America’s 11 million saltwater recreational anglers have been an afterthought for too long, but thanks to the leadership of President Trump and Commerce Secretary (Wilbur) Ross, the tide is changing. It is clear the Administration is committed to making sure America’s public resources remain public and that healthy natural resources are available for future generations.”

Appointments include Steve Heins of New York to the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council, Chester Brewer of Florida to the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council, and Phil Dyskow of Florida, Dr. Bob Shipp of Alabama, and Dr. Greg Stunz of Texas to the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council.

“The recreational fishing community along the Gulf Coast has found itself at a severe disadvantage in recent years due to an unbalanced Gulf Council,” said Patrick Murray, president of Coastal Conservation Association. “The Administration heard our calls for action and they have delivered. We look forward to the progress to come and better access to healthy marine resources for America’s recreational anglers.”

 “The Trump Administration understands the need for balance in our fishery management system because they care about jobs,” said Mike Nussman, president of the American Sportfishing Association.

“Saltwater recreational fishing in the South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico is the backbone of our industry and supports almost twice as many jobs there as the commercial industry. Creating more balanced Councils in these regions in particular was absolutely the right thing to do.”

Heins is a life-long angler who has worked with both sectors of New York’s fisheries. After 29 years of service, he recently retired from the New York Department of Environmental Conservation. Heins has a track record of working with the New York fishing community to build consensus and achieve management and policy decisions that are in the best interest of fisheries resources and the people who depend on them.
 
Brewer has more than 35 years of experience with recreational fisheries issues. As a member of the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council (SAFMC) and Chairman of the Advisory Panel Selection Committee, he has broad knowledge regarding the fisheries in the Southeast region and brings with him experiences from the recreational fishing sector. In addition to his work on the SAFMC, he  serves as Chairman Emeritus for the Florida state chapter of the Coastal Conservation Association, a board member of the West Palm Beach Fishing Club, and a member of the board of the Palm Beach County Fishing Foundation. Previously, he served 10 years as Recreational Advisor to the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tuna - U.S. Section.
 
With diverse knowledge of marine fisheries issues and proven business leadership, Dyskow retired following a successful career with the Yamaha Marine Group, culminating in his 13-year tenure as President. Dyskow has now devoted much of his free time toward fisheries conservation and management efforts. He has served on the Marine Fisheries Advisory Committee and on the National Boating Safety Advisory Council.
 
Dr. Shipp is considered one of the foremost experts on red snapper, triggerfish ,and other species of concern to Gulf Coast anglers. He has served on the Gulf Council for 18 years, including as Chairman of the Council, and also has served on the Council’s Science and Statistical Committee. As Chair Emeritus of the Department of Marine Science at the University of South Alabama, he brings a scientific and pragmatic perspective to difficult fishery management issues.
 
Dr. Stunz, one of the foremost authorities on Gulf of Mexico marine science, brings a balanced perspective to federal fisheries issues. Dr. Stunz is the endowed chair for Fisheries and Ocean Health and executive director of the Center for Sportfish Science and Conservation at the Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies. He is also a professor of Marine Biology at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi College of Science and Technology and is an author of more than 40 scientific papers in national and international journals.

Wednesday
Apr122017

There’s nothing like the adventure of saltwater fishing. The adrenaline rush of hooking into a billfish, a big striper, or hard-fighting redfish is second to none. That thrill is undoubtedly what attracts more than 11 million Americans to the sport.

Unfortunately, the laws that govern federal saltwater fisheries are out of date and have never taken recreational anglers into account. This has led to shortened or even cancelled seasons, reduced bag limits, and unnecessary restrictions.

The good news is a new law is making its way through Congress that should fix those problems.

The Modernizing Recreational Fisheries Management Act, or Modern Fish Act for short, has just been introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives. Rather than focusing on commercial fishing, the new bill is a comprehensive package specifically aimed at addressing the needs of the nation’s 11 million saltwater recreational anglers.

The Modern Fish Act will improve access to America’s federal waters and promote conservation of our natural marine resources. Simply put, that means more and better fishing.

Tell your Representative to support the Modern Fish Act today.

Friday
Sep162016

Recreational Fishing Allowed in New East Coast Marine Monument

 

In what now seems a never-ending struggle to ensure the future of recreational fishing, anglers have won another small victory. The Obama Administration is including it as an allowable activity in the new Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument, approximately 150 miles off the Massachusetts coast.

For years, sports fishing advocates have campaigned to convince politicians and unelected bureaucrats that recreational fishing should not be considered synonymous with commercial fishing in terms of government policy. And too often that message has fallen on deaf ears, especially with the formation of Obama's National Ocean Council, with the purpose of "zoning" uses of public waters.

"For decades, recreational fishermen have generally been an afterthought in ocean resource management," said Mike Leonard, Ocean Resource Policy Director for the American Sportfishing Association.

"And when recreational fishing has received attention by mangers and policymakers, it’s usually lumped in with other 'extractive' activities like mining, drilling and commercial fishing.

"Anglers are leading conservationists and fully support reasonable regulations to conserve the environment. But we also don’t want to see bad public policy that bans recreational fishing unnecessarily." 

The Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument covers a 4,913 square mile area off the Massachusetts coast that contains deep sea corals and other unique and fragile marine habitats. These areas are also popular offshore fishing spots for anglers who target billfish, tuna and mahi mahi near the ocean surface.

During the marine monument designation discussions, the recreational fishing and boating community advocated that recreational fishing should be allowed to continue because, among other reasons, the type of recreational fishing that occurred in these areas has no interaction with the bottom habitats that are being protected.

“Summarily removing the public from public waters is not the way to properly manage our oceans, and it is encouraging that this Administration recognized how critical it is for conservationists to be connected to the environment they work to protect,” said Patrick Murray, president of Coastal Conservation Association.

“Recreational fishing and marine conservation are not only compatible, but complimentary, and we are glad to see that angling will continue to be managed as a sustainable activity in these areas.”

The Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument is the third marine monument created or expanded by President Obama. The previous two decisions, which designated areas near Hawaii and remote Pacific islands, also allowed for recreational fishing.

Thursday
Sep012016

'Taking Kids Fishing Is More fun Than I've Ever Had in My Life'

Books have been written, including my own, about the value of fishing, and, more specifically, the importance of introducing children to the pastime.

But Howard Davis is a simple man who can sum up the latter in one sentence.

"Taking kids fishing is more fun than I've ever had in my life," said the founder of Kids First Cast, Inc. (KFC), a non-profit, all-volunteer organization in Nampa, Idaho. "With kids you don't have to deal with politics or anything else. It's just fishing."

And for the man sporting a twinkle in his eye and a Santa Claus beard, a child is not defined by age. "To me, a kid can be 3 or 103 years old," he said, recalling a 67-year-old woman whom he instructed.

"On her first cast, she caught the first fish of her life, and she was as excited as any 3-year-old. There are big kids too."

Through affiliations with various programs and bass clubs, Davis has been taking kids fishing for 25 years or so, when he can break away from his business, Howard's Tackle Shoppe.

"I've probably seen more kids in Idaho catch their first fish than anyone else," he said.

"And it's amazing how many come back and talk to me. One who is 35 now is still excited about fishing. And he still has the pack of worms that I gave him that day. He won't use them."

But encouragement from Dyann Aspiazu in 2011 is what prompted him to finally take the plunge and form his own organization, which will take an estimated 6,500 children fishing in 2016. That and a promise from Aspiazu that she would take care of the paperwork and all he would have to do is keep taking kids fishing, as well as do a little marketing and soliciting of donations.

"Starting it was not as difficult as I thought it would be," Davis said. "The most difficult thing is finding enough adult volunteers. I probably do 50 to 60 kids events alone every year."

As well as partnering with Idaho Fish and Game, KFC  sponsors outings for disabled veterans and dependents and survivors of military families. One of those occurred this past May for children whose parents were recently deployed. "One kid caught a 3 1/2-pound bass on his first cast," Davis remembered. "Another  caught 14 bluegill, and he was tickled to death."

The KFC director keeps kids focused on the fishing by not allowing cell phones. "I want them to see there's something besides cyperspace," he said.

He also debarbs hooks and emphasizes over-the-shoulder casting, to lessen the likelihood of catching another participant instead of a fish. "We're going to start putting together rules and guidelines," Davis said. "It's a learning process every time we do an event.

"And we seem to get busier and busier every year, because I can't say, 'No.'"

He admitted that asking for donations was a challenge  at first, but then he quickly realized  that "it's amazing what people will do when it's for kids."

Marketing, meanwhile,  seemed to take on a life of its own when Davis purchased a van with a utility box to transport fishing gear and other equipment to events around the state. Wherever it goes now, it's recognized as  "Howard's Bassmobile."

"When I first saw it, I thought, 'That would make a hell of a tackle box,'" he said with a laugh, adding that it is adorned with logos of businesses that support KFC, as well as an awning on the side and a big bass (mailbox) chasing a lure on top.

Another boost to sustainability has been the "Cabin Fever Reliever," held each winter as a fund-raiser and a way of promoting and thanking sponsors. Thousands gather to learn all kinds of outdoor skills, in addition to fishing.

If Howard Davis had the time and resources, he'd drive the Bassmobile cross country, introducing kids to fishing. "I'm 67-years-old, a diabetic and don't have the energy I used to," he said. "But when you care about the kids, things like that aren't an issue."

For those in other states who feel the same way, he encourages them to form their own non-profits to introduce children to fishing. "The appreciation that you receive from the kids and their parents is overwhelming," he said.

Finally, Davis added, if you have rods and reels that you're not using, send them to him at 1707 Garrity Blvd., Nampa, ID 83687. He will clean them up and give them to more kids as he continues to have "more fun than I've ever had in my life."

(This article appeared originally in B.A.S.S. Times.)