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Entries in Riley's Catch (2)

Monday
Jun122017

North Carolina Adds More Fishing Trails

North Carolina now has its second Educational Fishing Trail, with a third on its way to completion.

In March, volunteers worked with staffers from the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission (NCWRC) to build fish attractors for installation in Union County's Cane Creek Reservoir. By April 9, the trail should have been "unofficially ready to fish," according to Bill Frazier, North Carolina B.A.S.S. Nation (NCBN) conservation director. He added that completion of the trail at Thom-a-Lex in Davidson County should not be far behind.

Starting with the Oak Hollow trail, which opened last year, Frazier has been the guiding force those these unique projects that allow anglers to learn about habitat needs of bass as they fish a variety of cover placed sequentially according to season.

"We hope this is the next level of reservoir habitat enhancement and a new avenue to building the sport with younger anglers," said the member of the Archdale Bass Club who also is a regulatory manager for environmental programs in a regional water utility.

NCBN teams up with the commission and local governments to plan and place the trails, with a special emphasis on youth involvement.

"Youth members of N.C. B.A.S.S. played a huge role in the creation of the Oak Hollow Educational Fishing Trail by helping us design, build and install the structures for each fishing site, using leftover materials from a previous Boy Scout fish attractor project,” said Mark Fowlkes, a NCWRC aquatic habitat coordinator. “Likewise, youth from Riley’s Catch (a B.A.S.S. affiliate youth club in the Charlotte area) have helped design the Cane Creek Fishing Trail and will be there to help build and install structures."

Youth anglers also raised funds to purchase materials and the commission used money from the Sport Fish Restoration Program to purchase buoys, he added.

Frazier pointed out that the trails, thus far, have involved no cost to local communities. "We want them to see this as a huge asset for them," he said. "We need the tourism folks at the state level to step up and share the vision of how big this can really be."

Small, municipal lakes are "hugely underutilized resources that need just a little help to be stellar resources," he added.

Meanwhile, anglers like what they see at Oak Hollow. Following a March competition there, marina manager Lamar Lee said, "This was the best tournament we'd had in years, both in number of participants and fish caught. Now that the word has gotten out, it should be a busy season for us." 

Sunday
Jul102016

Robotic Casting Competition Explores Ways to Help Disabled Anglers, Honors Memory of Young Angler

 

Four years following his tragic death in a truck accident, Riley Laymon's vision endures with innovative ways to provide a brighter, more inclusive future for sport fishing.  In its latest endeavor, Riley's Catch sponsored a robotic casting competition for engineering students at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte.

"The four levels of competition were design, build, compete, and sell," said Bill Frazier, conservation director for the North Carolina B.A.S.S. Nation and the tie that binds it to Riley's Catch, a youth fishing club based in the Charlotte area. "It was not just some machine bouncing a ball or running an obstacle course. It provided a product connected to a real need from the beginning."

And that need is a casting device that can be mounted to wheelchairs, piers, or other props to help make fishing possible for the disabled. (Video on Riley's Catch Facebook page.)

"The one thing every team absolutely nailed was the need for fully or partially handicapped users," Frazier added. "They considered everything from Bluetooth to voice activation from both laptops and smart phones."

The 14 teams also factored in dexterity issues and even multiple rod options, as they competed for both accuracy and distance. With a cast of 106 feet, The Outcasters were declared the winner.

"Almost every team saw the ultimate best application and opportunity as a resource for wounded warriors," said the conservation director. "This really got my attention. Developed the right way, I can see these devices becoming a whole new outlet, and I can see a marriage with B.A.S.S. Conservation's lake enhancement projects."

And Riley would have liked that. Before his untimely death, he was working on a plan to start a fishing club at Weddington High School. In a letter to his favorite teacher, he wrote, "I think it would be cool to get our school and maybe some other schools to get teams for friendly competition. These guys that wanna help are both strong Christian men and are all for students getting out and fishing and think it's a good way to keep all of us out of trouble and have a good time."

Founded by his parents, Tom and Lisa, Riley's Catch "exists to empower students to live greater lives by using the outdoors in building strong hearts, minds, and bodies. "

Its four pillars are fun, friendship, faith, and fishing. For two years, it has sponsored the "Life of Impact Leadership Experience & Riley's Cup Fishing Tournament," which highlights creativity, collaboration, critical thinking, and communication skills, along with mentoring by outdoor professionals.

"These are the same kids who hosted the state championship last year," Frazier said. "The group acquired a large YMCA camp, housed, and fed them (competitors) for the entire weekend. They even got youth teams from out of state to come visit. And their technology project was the film of the B.A.S.S.Trail project (habitat/fishing course at Oak Hollow) that is out there on YouTube."

Riley's Catch kids fish, he added, "but that is the least they do. They seek to engage young people at an early age and provide them with a platform to grow as individuals and citizens. They provide events that expose them to technology and mentors that show them how life is integrated and gives them opportunities to think about what they want to do and how to get there.

"They are not a traditional group. They are thinking much bigger."