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Entries in sailfish (9)

Tuesday
Oct292013

Help Stop Longliners from Damaging Bluefin Tuna Fishery

 

Your help is needed to help end the waste of bluefin tuna in U.S. waters and ensure that longliners --- not recreational anglers --- are the ones held responsible for the incidental bycatch.

“Recreational anglers are leaders when it comes to conserving fish and their habitat,” said Jason Schratwieser, conservation director for the International Game Fish Association (IGFA). “And we’re hoping having recreational anglers sign on this petition will help NOAA Fisheries realize better protection is needed for this species.”

Go here to sign an IGFA-sponsored online petition to urge NOAA Fisheries to strengthen its current proposed rule for bluefin tuna by reducing longline bycatch and protecting bluefin spawning rounds.

Surface longlines kill thousands of game fish, including blue and white marlin, sailfish, sharks and bluefin tuna. In 2012, longliners threw back dead nearly 25 percent of the U.S. bluefin quota. The IGFA is calling on NOAA Fisheries to help reverse this trend by implementing strong measures that will protect spawning bluefin in the Gulf of Mexico and hold surface longliners accountable for bluefin bycatch, both of which mean increased fishing opportunities for recreational anglers.

“Thanks to email and social media it is easier than ever for an angler to spread the word and support this measure,” Schratwieser continued. “It only takes 30 seconds to sign the petition and share it on Facebook or email. Showing fisheries managers that sportsmen are engaged and concerned about our resources is critical to enacting change.”

You can read the proposed full rule here.

Wednesday
Sep252013

Five-Year-Old Catches Bill Fish Grand Slam

Most of us will fish for a lifetime without catching a billfish “grand slam” ---- three species in the same day.

But following a day off the Outer Banks of North Carolina with her father, five-year-old Taylor Collins already has checked that accomplishment off her bucket list.

It’s an unofficial grand slam because she had help from the mate. Still, it’s an amazing feat.

Read the full story here.

Wednesday
Apr112012

Your Help Needed to Protect Billfish From Commercial Harvest

Marlin and sailfish --- collectively called “billfish” --- are not only majestic sport fish; they are slow-growing, top-level predators whose populations cannot be sustained with commercial harvest.

In the United States, harvest and import of Atlantic-caught billfish is illegal. But, incredibly, fish caught in the Pacific Ocean flood into U.S. markets legally, further contributing to the depletion of these stocks.

 The Billfish Conservation Act (S. 1451 and H.R. 2706) would close U.S. commercial markets to Pacific billfish, preventing both their harvest and their importation.

“It would have a negligible impact on the commercial fishing industry in the U.S., since billfish represent only 0.1 percent of all seafood sales and there are many sustainable alternatives,” says Keep America Fishing (KAF).

“The subsequent increase in billfish abundance will add value to the recreational fishery, which annually generates billions of dollars to the economy and has a minimal impact on billfish populations.”

Go here to learn more and help protect some of the most important --- and threatened --- fish in our oceans.

And while you are at the KAF site, check out all of the other issues of concern to anglers. And make your voice heard!

Friday
Aug052011

Pacific Billfish Need Your Help

On our Pacific Coast, billfish need help.

Here’s the situation, according to Keep America Fishing:

Marlin, sailfish and spearfish, collectively called billfish, are highly esteemed by recreational anglers who practice catch-and-release fishing for these iconic fish while generating substantial income to the economy. Unfortunately, as a result of commercial overfishing, primarily by foreign countries, stocks of these magnificent big ocean fish are greatly depleted in both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.

It is currently illegal to harvest or import Atlantic-caught billfish into the U.S., but fish caught in the Pacific Ocean flood into U.S. markets in substantial numbers, threatening the survival of these fisheries. The Billfish Conservation Act of 2011 (S. 1451 and H.R. 2706), introduced into Congress on July 29, would close U.S. commercial markets to Pacific billfish, preventing their harvest and importation.

It would have a negligible impact on the commercial fishing industry in the U.S., since billfish represent only 0.1 percent of all seafood sales and there are many sustainable alternatives. The subsequent increase in billfish abundance will add value to the recreational fishery, which annually generates billions of dollars to the economy and has a minimal impact on billfish populations.

In short, this important bipartisan legislation will help restore billfish populations and improve recreational fishing opportunities while concurrently creating jobs and other economic benefits.

Take Action
In order to ensure this important bill is passed, Keep America Fishing needs your help!

 Send a message to your Members of Congress today, asking them to support the Billfish Conservation Act of 2011.

Thursday
Jun162011

Help Protect Billfish and Other Marine Life in Costa Rica

Join the campaign to make the sailfish the national fish of Costa Rica and to better protect billfish, sea turtles, and marine mammals from longliners and other non-selective fishing methods.

You can help by sending a note of support for this movement to Joyce Hernandez Arburola at the Tourism Institute in Costa Rica, jhernand@ict.go.cr.

Also, become a friend of Pez Vela (Sailfish) Como Pez Nacional de Costa Rica? on Facebook.

Many who fish for sailfish and other species in Costa Rican waters don’t live there so the in-country lobbying voice is small. “We need people outside the country to remind the government it is important to protect marine resources,” says a spokesperson for the campaign.

Already it is having an impact: Hilton Hotels in Costa Rica just removed sailfish and marlin from their menus.