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Entries in sailfish (10)

Sunday
Jun122016

How Fast Is Too Fast When Retrieving an Artificial Bait?

Bass aren’t the fastest fish in the world. But no matter how quickly you retrieve that crankbait or topwater, you can’t get it away from them--- if they want it.

That’s because even the fastest reels are capable of retrieving baits at only 3 or 4 miles per hour. A bass, meanwhile, can swim in bursts of 12 to 18 miles per hour.

Most of the time, they don’t, not even when they’re feeding. Three to 4 miles an hour likely is more common. That’s because bass are pot-bellied, ambush predators. Much of the time, they would rather chow down on a slow-moving worm or injured minnow. Walleye are much the same way.

The key to success when you’re out fishing is not to know how fast a bass or other species can swim, but how fast it is willing to swim. Experiment with speed until you find the right one.

Knowing your reel’s “speed” is important for this. One reel can look almost exactly like another but be faster or slower.

“Speed” refers to the amount of line retrieved in one full turn of the handle. A fast reel (7.0:1 gear ratio) can take in 30 to 31 inches of line per turn, while a slower one (5.0:1) only 20 or 22.

If you’re fishing with a crankbait, you might think that you want a faster reel, but probably you don’t, says Jeremy Sweet of Shimano. That’s because fast reels are used mostly when fishing soft plastics, to take up slack line quickly before the hook set or to get the bait back to the boat in a hurry after it is out of the strike zone.

Although not always, slower reels usually are better for faster-moving crankbaits. For one thing, they allow time for the baits to go to their proper depths. For another, they encourage more erratic, lifelike action.

*   *   *   *

Here are estimated top speeds of other common freshwater species according to various internet sources: rainbow trout 23 mph, catfish 15 mph, northern pike 11 mph.

*   *   *   *

With many salt-water species, you do want a speedy retrieve. That’s because tuna, wahoo, dorado (dolphin), billfish, and others are roving hunters that chase down their prey.

No one knows for certain how fast the fastest fish can swim. But experts estimate that a leaping sailfish can hit 68 miles per hour, based on the fact that it can strip out 100 yards of line in 3 seconds.

Other speed demons include the swordfish (60 mph), marlin (50), and wahoo (47).

Not surprisingly, the flounder is one of the slowest in the ocean, poking along at 2.4 mph, about the same as an eel.

And in case you’re wondering: the flying fish can reach gliding speeds of 35 miles per hour.

Tuesday
Oct292013

Help Stop Longliners from Damaging Bluefin Tuna Fishery

 

Your help is needed to help end the waste of bluefin tuna in U.S. waters and ensure that longliners --- not recreational anglers --- are the ones held responsible for the incidental bycatch.

“Recreational anglers are leaders when it comes to conserving fish and their habitat,” said Jason Schratwieser, conservation director for the International Game Fish Association (IGFA). “And we’re hoping having recreational anglers sign on this petition will help NOAA Fisheries realize better protection is needed for this species.”

Go here to sign an IGFA-sponsored online petition to urge NOAA Fisheries to strengthen its current proposed rule for bluefin tuna by reducing longline bycatch and protecting bluefin spawning rounds.

Surface longlines kill thousands of game fish, including blue and white marlin, sailfish, sharks and bluefin tuna. In 2012, longliners threw back dead nearly 25 percent of the U.S. bluefin quota. The IGFA is calling on NOAA Fisheries to help reverse this trend by implementing strong measures that will protect spawning bluefin in the Gulf of Mexico and hold surface longliners accountable for bluefin bycatch, both of which mean increased fishing opportunities for recreational anglers.

“Thanks to email and social media it is easier than ever for an angler to spread the word and support this measure,” Schratwieser continued. “It only takes 30 seconds to sign the petition and share it on Facebook or email. Showing fisheries managers that sportsmen are engaged and concerned about our resources is critical to enacting change.”

You can read the proposed full rule here.

Wednesday
Sep252013

Five-Year-Old Catches Bill Fish Grand Slam

Most of us will fish for a lifetime without catching a billfish “grand slam” ---- three species in the same day.

But following a day off the Outer Banks of North Carolina with her father, five-year-old Taylor Collins already has checked that accomplishment off her bucket list.

It’s an unofficial grand slam because she had help from the mate. Still, it’s an amazing feat.

Read the full story here.

Wednesday
Apr112012

Your Help Needed to Protect Billfish From Commercial Harvest

Marlin and sailfish --- collectively called “billfish” --- are not only majestic sport fish; they are slow-growing, top-level predators whose populations cannot be sustained with commercial harvest.

In the United States, harvest and import of Atlantic-caught billfish is illegal. But, incredibly, fish caught in the Pacific Ocean flood into U.S. markets legally, further contributing to the depletion of these stocks.

 The Billfish Conservation Act (S. 1451 and H.R. 2706) would close U.S. commercial markets to Pacific billfish, preventing both their harvest and their importation.

“It would have a negligible impact on the commercial fishing industry in the U.S., since billfish represent only 0.1 percent of all seafood sales and there are many sustainable alternatives,” says Keep America Fishing (KAF).

“The subsequent increase in billfish abundance will add value to the recreational fishery, which annually generates billions of dollars to the economy and has a minimal impact on billfish populations.”

Go here to learn more and help protect some of the most important --- and threatened --- fish in our oceans.

And while you are at the KAF site, check out all of the other issues of concern to anglers. And make your voice heard!

Friday
Aug052011

Pacific Billfish Need Your Help

On our Pacific Coast, billfish need help.

Here’s the situation, according to Keep America Fishing:

Marlin, sailfish and spearfish, collectively called billfish, are highly esteemed by recreational anglers who practice catch-and-release fishing for these iconic fish while generating substantial income to the economy. Unfortunately, as a result of commercial overfishing, primarily by foreign countries, stocks of these magnificent big ocean fish are greatly depleted in both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.

It is currently illegal to harvest or import Atlantic-caught billfish into the U.S., but fish caught in the Pacific Ocean flood into U.S. markets in substantial numbers, threatening the survival of these fisheries. The Billfish Conservation Act of 2011 (S. 1451 and H.R. 2706), introduced into Congress on July 29, would close U.S. commercial markets to Pacific billfish, preventing their harvest and importation.

It would have a negligible impact on the commercial fishing industry in the U.S., since billfish represent only 0.1 percent of all seafood sales and there are many sustainable alternatives. The subsequent increase in billfish abundance will add value to the recreational fishery, which annually generates billions of dollars to the economy and has a minimal impact on billfish populations.

In short, this important bipartisan legislation will help restore billfish populations and improve recreational fishing opportunities while concurrently creating jobs and other economic benefits.

Take Action
In order to ensure this important bill is passed, Keep America Fishing needs your help!

 Send a message to your Members of Congress today, asking them to support the Billfish Conservation Act of 2011.