My Facebook pages

Robert Montgomery

Why We Fish

Fish, Frogs, and Fireflies

Pippa's Canine Corner 

 

 

Loading..
Loading..
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
Loading..
Loading..
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
Loading..
Loading..
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
Loading..
Loading..
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
Get Updates! and Search
No RSS feeds have been linked to this section.

 

 

 

 

Entries in Seven Coves Bass Club (8)

Friday
Feb172017

Will Anglers Land a ShareLunker on Conroe in 2017 Bassmaster Classic?

Renee Linderoth caught this 13.8-pound largemouth in 2009 on Lake Conroe. Seventeen Conroe bass weighing 13 pounds or more have been entered in Texas' Toyota ShareLunker program. The largest weighed 15.93.

Will crowds at Minute Maid Park witness a double-digit bass weighed in during the 2017 GEICO Bassmaster Classic presented by DICK’S Sporting Goods? Considering the trophy potential of nearby Lake Conroe, where 52 of the nation’s best bass anglers will compete March 24-26, they might be treated to more than just a 10- or 11-pound bass — or two or three.
 
“I think we are going to see very big bass come weigh-in time in Houston, maybe a ShareLunker,” said Dave Terre, management/research chief of the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department (TPWD). “At Conroe, March is the prime month for that to occur. We’ll be ready.”
 
Established in 1986, the agency’s Toyota ShareLunker program encourages the catch and release of large fish and uses bass of 13 pounds or heavier for selective breeding, before being returned to the fishery from which they were caught. Of the 17 ShareLunkers caught at Conroe, five were taken during the month of March. The latest, a 13.14-pounder, was caught in early April 2015.
 
Terre explained that Conroe’s rise as a world-class fishery was no accident. “Making big bass and great fishing are products of good fisheries management and partners working together on fish habitat.”
 
B.A.S.S. National Conservation Director Gene Gilliland added, “For years, Lake Conroe was the poster child for grass carp gone bad. Back then, the bass fishermen thought the world was coming to an end. But a solid long-term management plan that married passionate B.A.S.S. club members with the expertise of Texas Parks and Wildlife biologists, turned Conroe into a top-tier fishery.”
 
Seven Coves Bass Club, a B.A.S.S. Nation club, took a leadership role among those partners, and for its efforts, received a 2013 Environmental Excellence Award from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. “This is probably the highest recognition our conservation program has received to date,” said Tim Cook, conservation director for the Texas B.A.S.S. Nation. “Every member should be proud to be part of an organization that gives so much back to the sport we all love.”
 
In 2008, following a second round of grass carp introductions to control invasive hydrilla, the club was awarded a grant for about $45,000 from B.A.S.S. and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation to build a plant nursery on property owned by the San Jacinto River Authority. The latter and TPWD also helped finance the effort.

“With the assistance and advice of TPWD, the San Jacinto River Authority, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Lewisville Aquatic Ecosystem Research Facility, they started growing native aquatic plants to go into Lake Conroe,” said TPWD biologist Mark Webb. “More people all the time were getting excited about coming in and helping to grow ecologically appropriate native plants to provide the kind of habitat we need for fish and wildlife in Lake Conroe.”
 
The following summer, 150 plants grown in the nursery were placed in the lake; they were shielded from grass carp and turtles with protective cages. Many more were to follow, as Seven Coves expanded its alliances for the betterment of the fishery. In 2010, Seven Coves received an additional $20,000 from the Toyota Texas Bass Classic and Bass Pro Shops as part of the first ever Friends of Reservoirs Foundation grant.

“This project has brought a wide range of stakeholders closer together, which has been positive for the angling community,” said Ron Gunter, a club member and assistant conservation director for the Texas B.A.S.S. Nation.
 
Today, the nursery still produces plants for Conroe, but TPWD and the Corps have taken a larger role in that aspect of the alliance, while Seven Coves members are devoting more time to helping the agency with artificial cover for the fishery.
 
“The plant work is to help propagate the (bass) species, and that definitely has helped on Conroe,” Gunter said. “The attractors will help anglers find a place to fish.”
 
Webb estimates that about 10,000 mature native plants have been added to the 21,000-acre fishery since 2008, with some, particularly water willow, now expanding on their own.
 
Along with good water quality and improved habitat, Conroe’s trophy potential is enhanced by stockings of Florida-strain largemouth bass fingerlings. The introductions are intended to keep big-bass genes abundant, rather than simply increase numbers.
 
More than 500,000 Floridas were stocked annually in 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011 and 2013, and some almost certainly have reached ShareLunker size.
 
Odds are improving that one of the Bassmaster Classic contenders will weigh in a ShareLunker during the world championship, as Terre predicted might happen. It would be the first 13-pounder in the Classic’s 47-year history and would easily eclipse the existing record, an 11-10 bass caught in Florida’s Kissimmee Chain in 2006.

For information about attending the 47th Bassmaster Classic in Houston, go to Bassmaster.com.

About the 2017 Bassmaster Classic

The 47th world championship of bass fishing, the GEICO Bassmaster Classic presented by DICK’S Sporting Goods will host 52 of the world’s best bass anglers competing for more than $1 million, March 24-26 in Houston, Texas. Competition and takeoff will begin each day at Lake Conroe Park (146 TX-105, Montgomery, Texas) at 7:20 a.m. CT. There will be off-site parking and shuttles for fans wanting to attend the takeoff. Weigh-ins will be held daily March 24-26 at 3 p.m. in one of Major League Baseball’s Top 20 largest stadiums, the Houston Astros’ Minute Maid Park (501 Crawford Street, Houston, Texas). 


In conjunction, the Bassmaster Classic Outdoors Expo presented by DICK’S Sporting Goods will be open daily only a block from Minute Maid Park at George R. Brown Convention Center, (1001 Avenida de las Americas, Houston, Texas) the largest in Classic history. Expo hours are Friday, March 24, noon – 8 p.m.; Saturday, March 25, 10 a.m. – 7 p.m.; Sunday, March 26, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. All events are free and open to the public.

Wednesday
Jan112017

Seven Coves Bass Club Helps Bring Classic to Lake Conroe

HOUSTON, Tex. --- Seven Coves Bass Club has received some impressive recognition for its conservation efforts.

In 2013, the Texas B.A.S.S. Nation (TBN) affiliate was awarded the Texas Environmental Excellence Award from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. “This is probably the highest recognition our conservation program has received to date,” said Tim Cook, TBN conservation director. “Every member of the Texas B.A.S.S. Nation should be proud to be part of an organization that gives so much back to the sport we all love

And now, Lake Conroe, a  Houston-area bass fishery that the club has helped shepherd to world-class status during the past eight years, will be the site of the 2017 GEICO Bassmaster Classic March 24-26.

"We're pretty pumped about it," said Ron Gunter, a past president and conservation director for the club. "It's an opportunity to showcase what we, with all our partners, have done."

But, he was quick to add, bringing to Classic to Conroe wasn't the priority, or even a consideration. "We just wanted to protect and enhance the fishery."

In doing so, though, they helped create a fishery worthy of the Classic, according to Tim Cook, TBN conservation director. "It's been producing 30-pound stringers all summer long," he said. "The lake has a significant number of 8-pound fish and I'm expecting that six to ten over 8 pounds will be caught each day. We've had five Toyota Texas Bass Classics on that lake, so anglers know how good it can be."

Read the rest of my story at Bassmaster.com.

Tuesday
Mar042014

Tourney Raises Funds for Conroe Restoration

During the past two years, the Lake Conroe Big Bass Extravaganza, sponsored by Legend Boats, has raised $6,000 for habitat restoration on this Texas fishery. Most of the funds will be directed toward the PVC habitat structure program, according to Derek Taylor, conservation director of the Seven Coves Bass Club (SCBC).

“Legend had heard of our conservation efforts on Lake Conroe at the 2010 Toyota Texas Bass Classic,” Taylor said. “They contacted us about assisting with the development of a big bass tournament at Lake Conroe.

“We were both humbled and honored that our dedicated conservation work was being noticed nationally in the fishing industry, and that a great company like Legend Boats wanted to work with us.”

Plagued with infestations of exotic vegetation and then an overpopulation of grass carp, Conroe suffered degraded habitat and a declining bass fishery for years. Then Seven Coves started to work, partnering with a variety of local, state, and national entities to restrict invasive plants and restore the fishery. Much of the effort has been directed at raising and planting beneficial native vegetation.

“This project benefits the environment by reducing harmful exotic vegetation in a sustainable manner, increasing sustainable native habitat for fish and other wildlife, sequestering harmful nutrients, reducing bank erosion, and stabilizing bottom sediments,” explained Mark Webb, a Texas Parks and Wildlife fisheries biologist.

During the second extravaganza this past April, Grant Rogers caught a 9.86-pound largemouth to win a custom Legend bass boat, as well as a $400 hourly prize.

Four prizes were awarded each hour, from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. during the two-day event.

“While many volunteered to work the 130-angler event, SCBC members who fished the event also took home 13 checks for more than $3,800,” Taylor said.

(This article appeared originally in B.A.S.S. Times.)

Tuesday
Jan212014

Angler Aid Needed to Revitalize Reservoirs

Dale Hollow photo by Robert Montgomery

Exclusive of the Great Lakes, more than 84 percent of freshwater anglers fish in lakes and reservoirs. With about 10,000 of them larger than 250 acres, manmade impoundments are especially important.

“Our generation has never known an America without reservoirs,” said Alton Jones, 2008 Bassmaster Classic winner.

But for far too long, reservoirs have been enduring a quiet death. As a result, the number who fish them, as well as natural lakes, has declined from about 45 million during the mid 1980s to 23 million in 2011.

What’s going on?

“Reservoirs may look like natural lakes, but they were created by people, and they must be cared for by people,” said Jones, a Texan well acquainted with the value of manmade waters.  “As they age, the quality of fish habitat declines, and so does the quality of fishing.”

Additionally, few reservoirs are being built anymore.

That’s why Jones is helping spread the word to anglers about the Reservoir Fisheries Habitat Partnership (RFHP) and its ambitious goal to revitalize these fisheries, most of which are 50 years old or more.

Aging degrades reservoirs, just as it does natural lakes. But the process is much more accelerated in manmade waters. Flooded timber decays and dissolves. Upstream sedimentation fills in backwaters and shallow areas. Water quality declines because of nutrient runoff and other pollution.

“We’re way behind in addressing these issues,” said Jeff Boxrucker, RFHP coordinator.

That opinion is echoed not only by Jones, but by Dave Terre, chief of fisheries management and research for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD).

“Fishing is still great,” Terre added. “But we need to restore habitat for now and future generations to keep the reservoirs functioning. And there’s no way that funding from state agencies is sufficient to tackle these problems.

“We need anglers and the fishing industry to be more pro-active. We need to all work together to improve fishing and water quality.”

A couple of notable examples, Table Rock in Missouri and Arkansas and Conroe in Texas, highlight how it can be done.

Work on Table Rock began in 2007, as a pilot program of sorts for National Fish Habitat Partnership, which spawned the reservoir partnership two years later. Partners include the Missouri Department of Conservation, Arkansas Game and Fish, Bass Pro Shops, and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, assisted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Thus far, 1,869 cedar and hardwood structures have been sunk in the reservoir, along with 114 rock structures and 76 stump fields. Twenty-six rock fences also have been added, as have 11 piles of stumps and rocks.

Assessment of what works best and where has been ongoing, according to Missouri’s Mike Allen.

“We have seen slight improvement (in the fishing), but we only have three years of sampling and we need more.”

Both creel and internet surveys revealed that 95 to 99 percent of anglers support the $4 million project, which is scheduled to end in December.

“We hope to do continuing work, but not through the current structure,” Allen said. “We are working to become a member of Friends of Reservoirs (FOR).”

FOR was created to provide non-profit funding and  grassroots manpower for reservoir restoration projects, with Seven Coves Bass Club at Lake Conroe the first chapter. Work there has focused on establishing native vegetation while controlling invasive hydrilla. The club even established its own nursery for growing beneficial plants, and it serves on the Lake Conroe Habitat Improvement Project Coalition with TPWD and other others.

Earlier this year, the coalition was honored with the Texas Environmental Award by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality.”

“Members are committed, passionate, and respected,” Terre said.

Serving as an adopt-a-lake program with individuals, non-government groups, and agencies all working together, FOR now has 13 chapters involving 11 organizations, 35 individuals, and 3 corporate sponsors. Additionally, 35 states have expressed support for the program, while five projects have been proposed and all of them funded. Financing comes from tax deductible donations, as well as grants, mostly from NFHP funds administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

“We would love to have lots of groups operating like Seven Coves Bass Club,” Terre said. “So far, we have seven FOR chapters in Texas. We want to see them in as many states as possible.”

Participating groups can expect to do habitat work, such as sinking brushpiles. But that’s not all they are needed for, according to Boxrucker.

“Of the top seven impairments, only one is happening with the reservoirs themselves,” he said. “The other problems come from outside.”

Based on a nationwide survey of resource managers, RFHP determined that sedimentation is the top problem, with 25 percent  of reservoirs having moderate to high impairment. Insufficient aquatic plants and structural habitat are next, followed by non-point source pollution, excessive nutrients, excessive inorganic turbidity, and “excessive levels of agriculture.”

“We hope to get angling groups started with the habitat work,” Boxrucker explained. “But once we get them involved and have momentum, we want to move upstream, to address other issues.

“We’re treating these reservoirs as parts of river systems. Most of the other partnerships (under the NFHP umbrella) are watershed-oriented, and we’re going to work with them too.”

These collaborative efforts not only will improve fishing, Classic winner Jones added.

“Good fish habitat is the foundation for healthy aquatic life and clean water supplies,” he said. “Water fish live in is the same water you drink. What’s good for the fish is good for you.”    

Reservoir Fisheries Habitat Partnership

The RFHP’s stated mission is “to protect and improve healthy aquatic habitat in reservoir systems for the benefit of fish and wildlife and the enhancement of quality of life for people and their communities.”

Its executive committee includes representatives from B.A.S.S., Bass Pro Shops, state agencies, Bureau of Land Management, Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and U.S. Geological Survey.

For more information:

RFHP

Friends of Reservoirs

National Fish Habitat Partnership

Table Rock fish attractor map and survey

 

Monday
Dec102012

Friends of Reservoirs Is Valuable Ally for Bass Anglers

Bass clubs that want to improve fisheries in their home impoundments have an invaluable ally in Friends of Reservoirs (FOR).

“This (partnership) is still in its infancy, and we need to get the word out about it,” said Ron Gunter of Texas’ Seven Coves Bass Club. “This is an excellent opportunity to get some help for cleanups and restorations.”

Earl Conway, conservation director for the New Mexico B.A.S.S. Federation, agrees.

“FOR gives us a national forum to interact with a nationwide network of fisheries management professionals, at a working level on real projects,” he said.

At Lake Conroe, FOR has been assisting Seven Coves with habitat improvement. Club members are growing aquatic vegetation to plant in Conroe, and have installed artificial structures to sustain the fishery until the plants become established.

“Phil Durocher and Dave Terre at Texas Parks and Wildlife were instrumental in getting Friends of Reservoirs started,” Gunter said. “They thought that Seven Coves would provide a good example and so we became the first chapter member organization last spring (2011).”

Along with sharing fisheries expertise, FOR allows the club to obtain tax-exempt donations and provides an account to hold those funds.

“The money stays there for us, earmarked for our project, and we don’t have to deal with finances,” the Texan added.

Gunter and Conway also praised Jeff Boxrucker and Jeff Lucero for their FOR leadership. Boxrucker is coordinator of the Reservoir Fisheries Habitat Partnership (RFHP), while Lucero represents the Bureau of Reclamation in the partnership.

“Jeff Lucero has been awesome and we owe him a pat on the back,” said Conway, who is working on improving habitat at Elephant Butte.

Friends of Reservoirs is the primary support institution for the RFHP, which says the role of the former is as follows:

  •  Provide supporters options to participate in the operation of the RFHP and to influence its governance through interaction with the Executive Committee, staff, and Regional Workgroups on the setting of reservoir conservation priorities, selection of fish habitat conservation projects, and long-term partnership goals and objectives
  • Provide sustainable funding for RFHP operations and project implementation
  • Help develop volunteer corps to support project implementation
  • Facilitate delivery of outreach for public education, awareness, and service

 (This article appeared originally in B.A.S.S. Times.)