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Entries in snakeheads (13)

Thursday
Jun052014

Snakehead Numbers Decline

Maryland DNR photo Good news from the snakehead front, as the Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) announced that catch and distribution of the exotic predator in the Potomac River was lower in 2013 than in 2012.

In announcing the finding from the Tidal Bass Survey, biologist Joe Love said, “The 2013 observations represent the first decrease in catch and distribution since the species was first discovered in the Potomac River (2004). It is not clear whether the cause of the decline is increased angling effort or other factors.”

But angling effort has increased considerably in recent years, aided by initiatives from both DNR and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Additionally, the state is providing more incentive for catch and harvest of snakeheads by instituting a state record program and including an invasive species category for awards in the Maryland Fishing Challenge.

Not all the news regarding snakeheads is good, however, as two adults were captured by electrofishing for the first time ever in the Wicomico River. Anglers had reported catching them there as early as 2011.

“It appears that it takes two years between angling reporting and collection by Maryland DNR’s Tidal Bass Surveys,” Love said.

Additionally, adult snakeheads were collected from the Patuxent, in numbers similar to 2012.

“Based on suitable habitat for northern snakehead and the population estimate, we calculated that there were about five per acre of suitable habitat,” the biologist explained. “Reports for Little Hunting Creek and Anacostia River ranged from four to nine northern snakehead per acre.”

The invasive fish also was collected “in relatively small numbers” from the Rappahannock, Rohde, Blackwater, and Nanticoke Rivers.

A small snakehead was captured in a trap from a ditched area that connects the Blackwater to the Little Choptank. This suggests that the fish could use this pathway to also colonize the latter, the biologist said.

Friday
Sep202013

Asian Carp Just One Big Leap From Lake Michigan

After being introduced into the Mississippi River, Asian carp will be kept out of the Great Lakes in the same way that snakeheads were kept out of the Delaware River system after they were introduced into the Potomac, and in the same way that zebra mussels were kept out of the rest of the country after they were introduced into the Great Lakes.

In other words, Asian carp won’t be kept out of the Great Lakes, and a billion-dollar sport fishery could be devastated as a result of that invasion.

Here’s the latest chapter in this saga that has only one ending but a multitude of plot twists on the way to the climax:

A 53-inch, 82-pound carp (probably a bighead) has been found in an Illinois lake less than 1,000 feet from the Calumet River, which flows into Lake Michigan.

Read the rest of the story here.

Don’t expect Burmese pythons to stay in the Everglades either. Oh, and, by the way, there’s another big snake on the block, courtesy of an unregulated and irresponsible pet industry.

Thursday
May022013

Snakeheads in the Big Apple?

Snakeheads might be lurking in waters of New York City’s Central Park.

I’m sorry about this, but this is just the way my mind works: When I first learned of this, I couldn’t help but think of the song made famous by Frank Sinatra.

I want to wake up in that city 
That doesn't sleep 
And find I'm king of the hill 
Top of the heap 

 And how about this? 

If I can make it there 
I'll make it anywhere 
It's up to you 
New York, New York

I hope that’s not true in regard to snakeheads. 

Here’s the New York Times’ take on the hunt for snakeheads in Central Park.

Friday
Jan252013

Thirty Invaders Bite the Dust in Python Challenge

Thirty Burmese pythons have been killed so far in the Florida Everglades as part of the Python Challenge that began Jan. 12.

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission says that eradicating pythons is not the goal of program, which ends Feb. 10. Rather, wildlife officials hope to raise awareness about the snake’s threat to native wildlife and the fragile Everglades ecosystem. Also, they believe that the hunt will help them collect valuable information about the exotic predator’s habits so that it might be better controlled.

By the way, plug "pythons on the loose" and "alligators on the loose" into a Google search if you want to get an idea of the problem that we have in this country with irresponsible pet owners and an under-regulated exotic pet industry. They're also the ones that introduced some of our troublesome aquatic plants, including Eurasian watermilfoil. Likely, they are responsible for snakeheads as well.

Wednesday
Jan022013

Snakehead Population Continues to Grow in Potomac

Potomac River guide Steve Chaconas with a northern snakehead.

News is not good regarding snakeheads in the Potomac River, according to the Maryland Department of Natural Resources (MDNR).

Research indicates that since 2006 “distribution in Maryland has rapidly increased.”  Also, “relative abundance has doubled most years.”

On the plus side, “anglers are handling, killing, cooking, and eating the fish.”

To learn more, go here.