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Entries in spotted bass (15)

Monday
Oct162017

New Arkansas Bass Plan Includes Smallouth, Spots

Arkansas Game and Fish Commission (AGFC) has released its blueprint for improving bass fishing. Unlike previous versions in 1990 and 2002, this latest Reservoir Black Bass Management Plan focuses on smallmouth and spotted bass, as well as largemouth.

In announcing this latest update, AGFC said the mission of plan "is to facilitate the management of a fishery--- fish, habitats, and people--- and provide background and guidelines for AGFC's management of Arkansas reservoirs and lakes while utilizing the best available science and practicing adaptive management."

According to the plan, variables that resource managers must consider include sampling, habitat, health and disease, tournament fishing, supplemental stocking, population characteristics, and human dimensions.

Goals include the following:

  • Managing black bass fisheries using the best data available for decision making, including current and historical standardized sampling data, the scientific body of literature, and this plan.
  • Striving to better understand black bass anglers and to increase interaction with them to make them aware of our efforts, incorporate their preferences into management decisions, and foster greater collaboration and trust from both parties.
  • Using science-based methods to evaluate reservoir habitat quality, and prescribe both chemical and physical methods for habitat enhancement where necessary.
  • Maximizing efficiency and effectiveness of the AGFC culture system to produce sufficient quantities of fish to meet management goals. Evaluating the contribution of stocked fish to reservoir fish populations to ensure that resources are maximized.
  • Seeking to obtain the personnel, equipment, and other resources necessary to carry out the provisions of this plan.
Wednesday
Oct112017

Bullards Bar Spot Finally Recognized as Record By Both California and IGFA

California and the International Game Fish Association (IGFA) finally are in agreement. The 11-pound, 4-ounce (11.25)  Alabama spotted bass caught by Nick Dulleck in February 2017 on Bullards Bar Reservoir is both a world and state record.

For IGFA, which recognized the catch in May, the previous world record had been 10.38 pounds, also taken at Bullards Bar. But a 10.95-pound fish caught at the same fishery in 2015 had been recognized by California. IGFA had disqualified that fish because its original weight was reported as 11.2.

In recent years, reports have surfaced regularly of other fish being caught that would have been state records, but the reporting process was so cumbersome that anglers didn't want to participate. In particular, they didn't want to kill the fish, either for DNA sampling or because a biologist wasn't immediately available to certify the catch.

Dulleck, however, was prepared, rolling video from cast to release, including weighing the fish on a certified scale in front of witnesses. He is now working with California Department of Fish and Wildlife (DFW) to make state certification easier for other anglers.

"I didn't want this record to just be about me," he said. "I've worked with the IGFA and the California DFW a lot through this whole process. They have been great to work with. If I can help make the whole process better for all anglers, then I really want to do that. Then I will have done something that matters." 

Monday
Dec192016

Another Double-Digit Spotted Bass Caught in California

 

What may be a world record for spotted bass was caught Friday by Cody Meyer on Califorinia's Bullards Bar Reservoir. This is from his Facebook page:

"What an amazing day. I went fishing with my buddy JR Wright, and ended up catching a 10.80 spotted bass today. It has the potential to be a World Record. I am really thankful that I have sponsors who make the best gear in fishing. A fish like this on light line took every bit of technology I had in the boat. I was using one of my prototype Daiwa Corporation - USA Tatula rods which is a signature series coming out soon, and a Daiwa Exist reel, 6-lb Seaguar Fluorocarbon Tatsu line, a Strike King Lure Company Ocho. I spotted it suspended over 100-feet of water using Garmin Panoptix. Being able to see them out in front of us before we moved over them made it possible. In total, our best 5 went for over 40 pounds."

Right now, the IGFA record is 10.5 (10 pounds, 6 ounces). But California recognizes an 11-pound, 3-ounce fish (about 11.2) caught in 2015 as the state record. Additionally, a couple of more unofficial 11 pounders have been caught in California waters recently.

Like the largemouth and smallmouth, the spotted bass is an introduced species in California.

Friday
Jul012016

New Bass Regs. in Effect for Florida

New black bass regulations now are in effect in Florida. Here's  a summary:

  • The previous three black bass fishing zones and 40 areas with special bass regulations have been eliminated.
  • All species of black bass are included in the five fish daily aggregate black bass bag limit. This is the same as the previous statewide rule.
  • Largemouth bass: Only one may be 16 inches or longer in total length per angler, per day, with no minimum length limit.
  • Suwannee, shoal, Choctaw and spotted basses: 12-inch minimum size limit, only one may be 16 inches or longer in total length.

Before developing proposals for amending current regulations, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation (FWC) staff received input from thousands of bass anglers, and blended angler desires and opinions with decades of fish population research.

“We are confident that these new regulations meet the desires of our bass anglers, ensuring that Florida lakes will continue to produce high quality fisheries,” said Tom Champeau, director of FWC’s Division of Freshwater Fisheries.

“Florida’s reputation for trophy bass is one reason we are known as the Fishing Capital of the World and these new regulations will help provide our anglers with unforgettable fishing experiences.”

Florida is home to five species of black bass: largemouth, Suwannee, shoal, Choctaw and spotted bass. Largemouth bass are the state freshwater fish and are found throughout Florida, while the other species are found only in rivers in the north central and northwest regions.

Visit MyFWC.com/fishing and click on “Freshwater,” then “Regulations” for a copy of the complete regulations.

One of the primary goals of the new regulations is to protect larger trophy bass desired by most anglers. The TrophyCatch program offers great prizes for anglers who document and release largemouth bass weighing eight pounds or heavier. Visit TrophyCatchFlorida.com for more details and to register for the program.

Sunday
Apr102016

FWC Simplifies Bass Creel Regulations for Florida

Bass regulations in Florida will be simpler, effective July 1. Most importantly, the statewide limit remains at five, but with no minimum length for largemouths and only one fish of 16 inches or longer allowed.

“The intent is to simplify existing rules and increase abundance of larger bass statewide,” said fisheries chief Tom Champeau.

"Anglers are practicing voluntary catch-and-release at record levels," added the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). "While reduced harvest of large bass is beneficial, allowing more bass under 16 inches to be kept may improve some fisheries by reducing competition so other individuals grow faster and larger."

The new regulations will replace a three-zone system for size limits, as well as 42 site-specific regulations.

Under the new rules, those five bass can be any combination of largemouth, spotted, shoal, Suwannee, and Choctaw bass. But for the latter four, the 12-inch minimum remains in effect. Additionally, a catch-and-release-only zone has been established for shoal bass in the Chipola River.

The tournament permit program will continue to allow anglers temporary possession of five bass of any size.  "This successful program has been in place for over 20 years and allows delayed-release bass tournaments to remain viable, but requires proper care, handling, and release of all bass caught during the tournament," FWC said.

The agency will publicize the changes in its new regulations summary, as well as online, on signs at boat ramps and fish management area kiosks, and at local bait and tackle stores. "The FWC will monitor the results, but anticipates the simplification will make it easier for anglers, while resulting in more bass longer than 16 inches being caught and released routinely by anglers in the future," it said.