This area does not yet contain any content.
Get Updates! and Search
No RSS feeds have been linked to this section.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 


 

 

Entries in TRCP (18)

Thursday
Jan302014

Green Decoys Exposes 'Radical Environmentalists' in Outdoors Camouflage

For awhile, I’ve been concerned that the interests of anglers and hunters are being weakened and compromised, as groups that supposedly represent them embrace friendship and funding from preservationist and left-wing organizations and financiers.

In fact, I wrote about this awhile back, when I discovered that AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka had been named to the board of the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership (TRCP). (You can read my post about that here.)  I also was concerned about its acceptance of grants from left-leaning trusts.

Others in the fishing and hunting community share my concerns, it seems, as the launch of a new website, Green Decoys, demonstrates. Founded by the Center for Consumer Freedom (CCF), its intent is to “expose radical environmentalists camouflaged under outdoor-sounding names whose real objective is to serve the interests of their wealthy backers.”

Its targets: TRCP, Izaak Walton League of America, Trout Unlimited, Backcountry Hunters and Anglers, and Bull Moose Sportsmen’s Alliance.

“These self-anointed sportsmen’s groups posture as advocates for the hunting and fishing communities, but their funding tells the real story,” said CCF Senior Research Analyst Will Coggin. “Given the millions they collectively take from radical activists, it’s clear they serve an environmentalist master, not America’s sportsmen.”

My biggest regret regarding this campaign is that it clearly is based on the assumption that real anglers and hunters can be only on the right-side of the political spectrum. Traditionally, I don’t think that’s true.

But the sad reality today is that the leftist ideology in general is anti-fishing and anti-hunting, as its direction is shaped by environmental preservationists who want to force us off the water and out of the woods.

I write about the difference between being an environmentalist and a conservationist in my new book, Why We Fish.

Here’s an excerpt from the essay “I’m Not an Environmentalist”:

“We don’t want to be called 'environmentalists' because we associate that description with agenda-driven campaigns for preservation policies that often are not backed by scientific evidence.

“For anglers, 'conservationist' is the term of choice. Conservationists believe in both protection and sustainable use of our lands, waters, and other natural resources. They follow an ethical code of behavior and embrace a stewardship philosophy.

“So we have two factions, conservationists and environmentalists, sharing many of the same values, but more often viewing each other as enemies than allies.”

Thursday
Feb282013

Drought Threatens Future for Fishermen, Fisheries

A water crisis is looming, with sport fisheries and anglers as the likely losers, according to Jim Martin, conservation director for the Berkley Conservation Institute.

“It’s a problem that no one wants to talk about,” he said, pointing out that have of the continental U.S. now is under drought conditions.

“We have to start talking about it.”

Martin gave that message at a freshwater summit sponsored by the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership during the recent Bassmaster Classic in Tulsa, Okla.

The country needs a plan to prioritize the use of water and to manage development, he said. And the sooner the discussion begins, the more influence that outdoor enthusiasts will have.

Once the crisis hits and recreational use of water is competing against agriculture, manufacturing and urban populations, the fishing industry won't have the votes to compete.

 "A hundred million sportsmen are going to be lost in the shuffle," he said.

Read more in Tulsa World

Wednesday
Nov282012

Anglers, Conservation Suffer Because of Dysfunctional D.C.

Score another victory for political gridlock in Washington, D.C., and this time anglers and hunters are the losers.

In an argument over procedure, the U.S. Senate failed to move The Sportsman’s Act of 2012 (S. 3525) forward. Vote was almost strictly on party lines, with Republicans responsible for this one.

Republicans support most of what the bill would do, but blocked the legislation because of objections about spending on conservation programs, which would violate budget rules. Democrats pointed out that the bill also would raise money.

“The shocking aspect of this bill’s defeat – one that would have such a positive impact on anglers, hunters and fish and wildlife conservation - is that it occurred over a budget argument giving the Secretary of the Interior the ability to increase the duck stamp price $10, thus pumping more dollars into wetland conservation for both fisheries and wildlife benefits” said Gordon Robertson, vice president of the American Sportfishing Association (ASA).

“Adding salt to the wound is that the increase is strongly supported by waterfowl hunters who champion the user pay-user benefit concept for fish and wildlife conservation along with all sportsmen and women as well as the fishing and hunting industries,” said Robertson. “The Congressional Budget Office has stated that overall, S. 3525 would reduce the nation’s deficit by $5 million.”

“It’s a cruel twist that the Senate failed to move S. 3525 over a budget procedural question when in the end the bill adds to conservation and would most certainly have a positive impact on the nation’s economy,” he continued. “It would truly be a tragedy if this historic piece of legislation went down in flames due to partisanship and simmering disputes over Senate rules and procedures that have nothing to do with the merits of the bill.”

The Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership added this:

“With their backs up against the so-called fiscal cliff, elected officials from both sides of the aisle locked antlers again. American sportsmen are paying the price.

“Hunters and anglers are experiencing the fallout from congressional inaction as access dwindles, development diminishes opportunities for sportsmen and funding for conservation disappears.”

Read more from TRCP here.

Keep America Fishing shows you how your senators voted.

Here’s a news story about the vote.

Monday
Jul162012

Legislation Proposed to Increase Access for Anglers, Hunters

If you fish and/or hunt, you should express your support for the HUNT Act (H.R. 6086), recently introduced into the U.S. House of Representatives. Go here for contact information.

The Hunt Unrestricted on National Treasures Act would direct federal agencies to inventory all public lands greater than 640 acres where hunting and fishing are legal but inaccessible, according to the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership (TRCP) and National Wildlife Federation (NWF). It also calls for improving access and would finance land acquisitions from willing sellers through a small percentage of Land and Water Conservation Fund monies.

“Surveys conducted over the last few years show that, for the first time ever, access trumps Second Amendment rights as hunters’ No. 1 priority,” said John Gale, a NWF regional representative.

 “This important legislation by Congressman Heinrich will set a course that secures access to places like New Mexico’s iconic Sabinoso Wilderness while also ensuring the health of wildlife habitat and water quality.”

The funding provided for in the HUNT Act “gives the plan some legs” and means that hunters will see immediate impacts, he added.

“If passed, the HUNT Act will directly benefit millions of American sportsmen and the nation’s powerful outdoor recreation economy,” said Joel Webster, director of the TRCP’s Center for Western Lands.

“A recent poll of Western voters identifying as sportsmen shows that a majority supports upholding measures conserving clean air, clean water, natural areas and wildlife,” continued Webster. “And more than 9 in 10 agree that public lands are an essential part of their state’s economy. To this end, the TRCP and our partners remain dedicated to advancing efforts that enable conservation of and access to these invaluable public resources.”

Go here to learn more.

Friday
Jun292012

TRCP Critical of Proposed Cuts for Resource Management

TRCP photo

Proposed legislation in the U.S. House of Representatives “would dramatically reduce critical resource programs and sharply curtail federal agencies abilities to responsibly manage public resources and outdoor opportunities,” according to the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership (TRCP.

 “This misguided action by the House not only would roll back investments in conservation spending,” said TRCP President and CEO Whit Fosburgh. “It also undermines the foundation of our nation’s conservation policy. The bill wages a full-frontal assault on basic natural resources management measures that will cost us money and jobs, both in the near and long term.”

TRCP provides the following “lowlights” of cuts included in the bill: 

  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service budget cut by $317 million
  • BLM operations and maintenance cut by $39.6 million
  • North American Wetlands Conservation Act cut by $13 million
  • EPA budget cut by 17 percent
  • Land and Water Conservation Fund reduced by 80 percent 
  • State and tribal wildlife grants cut by $30 million
  • Chesapeake Bay restoration funding cut by $7 million

 Read the full story here.

By the way, the proposed cut for EPA is regrettable, but certainly understandable, considering its abuse of power during this administration. Remember the Sacketts? Or how about the official who resigned after comparing his enforcement strategy to Roman crucifixion?