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Entries in zebra mussels (62)

Monday
May262014

Zebra Mussels Benefit Lakefront Property Owners

The damage done to fisheries and water supply infrastructures by zebra mussels has been documented for decades.

But now one researcher has discovered that these exotic shellfish are benefiting a few lucky waterfront property owners, even as they wreak havoc on ecosystems.

“We find that property values generally are higher on lakes with zebra mussels,” said Martin Meder, a University of Wisconsin economics student who decided to analyze state data for 400 lakes.

With the assistance of Marianne Johnson, a College of Business economics professor, he looked at property assessments for sale of houses on lakes known to be infested with zebra mussels.

Meder added that his research doesn’t address the causation, but “with statistical certainty, I can say that zebra mussels are associated with an approximately 10 percent increase in lakefront property prices.”

He theorized that the increased water clarity that comes with a zebra mussel infestation is one reason for the increase.

And, he added, “Some research has shown that they (zebra mussels) disadvantage some unpopular fish species. They blanket the bottom of the lake bed so carp can’t feed . . .

“They also seem to be advantageous to fish species that people like, like smallmouth bass.”

Friday
Mar282014

Mapping the Invasion

This screen shot shows zebra and quagga mussel invasion as of 2006.

Nature Conservancy has produced some great interactive maps showing how invasive aquatic species have spread out across the country from their point of introduction.

Featured species include bighead and silver carp, zebra and quagga mussels, Eurasian ruffe, round goby, sea lamprey, and black carp.

Also, in late 2012, the organization released a report saying that aquatic invasive species “cost businesses and consumer in the Great Lakes region hundreds of millions of dollars annually in direct costs and even more from indirect costs related to removal, maintenance, and management of those species.

“Meanwhile, state and federal governments are currently forced to spend additional millions as they attempt to control the impacts and prevent the spread of AIS (aquatic invasive species).”

According to the report, the largest industry affected by AIS in the Great Lakes is tourism and recreation, which is responsible for employing more than 90,000 people in the region, generating $30.3 billion annually in revenue. Costs range from monitoring and controlling AIS to lost revenue from beach closings affecting hotels, restaurants and other tourism-related businesses.

Friday
Mar212014

Stop Blaming the 'Villagers'

Today’s biology lesson is about the life cycle of zebra mussels. As an added bonus, I’m going to provide a little instruction in the lost art of journalism.

First, read this excerpt from an article about the exotic shellfish on the KAAL website in Minnesota:

 * * *

"Say you've pumped in 100 gallons of water off Lake Minnetonka and it comes in now and then pumps out, any villagers that happen to be in that tank can't get out either,” said Larry Meddock with the Water Sports Industry Association. The villagers are trapped. That's important because the filter reduces the risk of any hitchhikers being transported from one lake to another through ballast tanks on boats.

* * *

Now here’s the journalism lesson: Know what you’re talking about.

And here’s a clue to the biology lesson: “Villagers” don’t live in water; they live in a village. And they are people, not zebra mussels.

What, then, are the “villagers” that the KAAL author is referring to? Had she bothered to do any research, she would have discovered that the correct term is “veligers.”

Here’s what you need to know about zebra mussels and what that article failed miserably to explain:

Veligers are the microscopic, free-swimming larvae of zebra and other mussels. They can drift in the water for several weeks, before settling onto hard surfaces to grow into hard-shell adults.

They likely were introduced to the Great Lakes as veligers in the ballast water of ocean-going ships. They also are being spread within the United States in ballast, as well as in bilges, livewells and any other water left in a boats as they leave infected waterways.

As adults, they can hitchhike by attaching to boat hulls, props, and trailers, surviving out of water for a week or so.

That’s why it’s so important that you clean, drain, and dry your boat after leaving any water infected with zebra or quagga mussels. And the failure of many to take these precautions is a major reason that these problematic shellfish have spread out from the Great Lakes, and, in recent years even crossed the Continental Divide.

Aside from outcompeting native species for oxygen, food, and habitat, they clog water and hydropower plants, costing the nation’s economy more than $1 billion a year in damages and associated control costs annually.

Stop the spread of “veligers,” and leave the “villagers” alone.

Friday
Jan242014

Texas Expands Requirement to Drain Boats

In an effort to slow the spread of zebra mussels through Texas fisheries, those fishing in 30 more counties will be required to drain their boats. Mostly the effort is aimed at protecting the Trinity, Brazos, Colorado, and Guadalupe river basins.

Thus far, the exotic shellfish have been found in six Texas locations, and resource managers fear they will hitchhike from contaminated waters to other lakes in livewells and bilge water, as well as on trailers and props.

Now consideration is being given to going statewide with the requirement.

Learn more here.

Friday
Jan102014

Mussel Threat Grows in West

Unlike zebras, quagga mussels can colonize soft substrates as well as hard surfaces, such as this boat prop.

Out West, resource managers are waging a fierce battle to keep zebra and quagga mussels out of their lakes and reservoirs.  I wish them well, but all it takes is one boat out of thousands launched to infect a waterway.

At Lake Tahoe last year, boat inspectors found 36 vessels infested with exotic species, as they inspected more than 7,000 and decontaminated more than 4,000. Most importantly, though, managers found no evidence of mussels in the lake.

Other fisheries were not as lucky, as a quagga infestation was discovered in California’s Lake Piru, with boat quarantines implemented at Cachuma and Casitas.

By the way, quaggas are even more troublesome than zebras, as they can withstand colder water than their cousins and they can colonize soft substrates.

According to the Great Lakes Echo:

“These abilities have helped it colonize most of benthic Lake Michigan. Just like zebra mussels, quagga mussels are quite effective at clogging water intake pipes and other infrastructure. Mitigating these impacts has cost Great Lakes residents millions of dollars.”

The Echo annually publishes Tim Campbell’s invasive-species rewrite of “The Twelve Days of Christmas, which he created in 2011 for the Wisconsin Sea Grant.

“Twelve quaggas clogging, ‘leven gobies gobbling, ten alewives croaking, nine eggs in resting, eight shrimp ‘a swarming, seven carp and counting, six lamprey leapingFIVE BOAT-WASH STATIONS! Four perch on ice, three clean boat steps, two red swamp crayfish and a carp barrier in the city!”